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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2016 March;56(3):214-22

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Effects of intra-set rest on the ability to repeat work at maximal isometric strength

Juan M. GARCÍA-MANSO 1, Teresa VALVERDE 2, Luis ARRONES 3, Manuel NAVARRO-VALDIVIELSO 1, Estélio H. MARTIN DANTAS 4, Marzo E. DA SILVA-GRIGOLETTO 5, 6

1 Sports Training Analysis and Planning Laboratory, Department of Physical Education, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain; 2 “San Vicente Mártir” Valencia Catholic University, Valencia, Spain; 3 Pablo Olavide University, Sevilla, Spain; 4 Rio de Janeiro (UNIRIO) Federal Univerzity, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 5 Department of Physical Edìucation, Sergipe Federal University, São Cristóvão, Brazil; 6 Scientific Sport Association, Spain, Cordoba, Spain

BACKGROUND: The aim of this paper was to analyze how the rest between interval repetitions in intra-set training (at maximal isometric loads) could affect the ability to repeat maximal contractions in subjects with different levels of performance and different experience in strength development work.
METHODS: Twenty subjects were divided randomly into two different groups depending on their sport characteristics: ten subjects were trained in strength development work (Group Strenght - 23.1±4.6 years; 172.0±5.3 cm; 79.9±12.1 kg; 2175.6±490.8 N; 46.9±4.9 mL/kg.min), and ten subjects were trained in endurance work (Group Endurance- 21.3±4.5 years; 172.4±4.1 cm; 60.0±4.6 kg; 815.5±206.5 N; 67.4±4.9 mL/kg.min). To assess the ability to repeat maximal efforts, 20 repetitions of 5 seconds were performed in a half-squat position, with 1 minute of rest between repetitions.
RESULTS: For both groups, four different phases were observed in the Interval Maximal Force test during the 20-repetition assessment: potentiation, maintenance, moderate loss, and significant loss. For the GE, the loss in maximum strength capacity began in the fourth repetition (GS4th: 3.4%, ns, Effect Size: 0.09 vs. GE3th: 1.6%; ns; ES: 0.06) and reached a statistically significant value in the twelfth repetition (GS12th: 12.7%, P=0.03, ES: 0.35 vs. GE7th: 12.5%; P=0.01; ES: 0.49). The number of repetitions at which the strength began to decrease depended on the subject’s sport characteristic and performance level.
CONCLUSIONS: This study shows how an appropriate intra-set rest inclusion can significantly increase the work performed in every set without changing the muscle contraction characteristics, thus delaying muscle fatigue and maintaining the desired training objective.

language: English


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