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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 November;55(11):1310-7

Copyright © 2015 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Static stretching vs. dynamic warm-ups: a comparison of their effects on torque and electromyography output of the quadriceps and hamstring muscles

Williams N. 1, Coburn J. 1, 2, Gillum T. 1

1 Department of Kinesiology, California Baptist University, Riverside, CA, USA; 2 Department of Kinesiology, California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA, USA


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AIM: The aim of this paper was to determine if two different warm-up protocols differently affect torque of the quadriceps and hamstrings, and electromyography (EMG) output of the rectus femoris (RF) and vastus lateralis (VL) when completing 30 maximal leg extensions and curls.
METHODS: Twenty-one healthy male (N.=8) and female (N.=13) subjects volunteered to participate in a familiarization session and three testing sessions. The three testing sessions control, dynamic, and static were completed in a counterbalanced order on non-consecutive days. First, subjects warmed-up on a treadmill for five minutes before completing six dynamic movements, six static-stretches, or no stretches. They then rested for five minutes before completing 30 maximal leg extensions and curls at a speed of 60 s-1.
RESULTS: A significant decrease in quadriceps torque output over time was determined for the dynamic protocol when compared to the control (P<0.01) and static (P<0.05) protocols. A significant decrease was found in peak quadriceps torque for the dynamic protocol (P<0.01) when compared to the static, and a significant increase was found for the static protocol (P<0.05) when compared to the control. A significant decrease in average quadriceps torque was found for the dynamic protocol when compared to the static (P<0.05) and control (P<0.01) protocols. No difference was found in hamstring torque or EMG output of the RF and VL.
CONCLUSION: Short duration static-stretching has the ability to increase peak and average torque of the leg extensors, while some types of anaerobic exercise involving maximal contractions to fatigue may be hindered by performing dynamic movements as part of the warm-up.

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tgillum@calbaptist.edu