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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 September;55(9):914-21

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Effects of training using an active video game on agility and balance

Su H. 1, Chang Y-K. 2, Lin Y-J. 1, Chu I.-H. 1

1 Department of Sports Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Taiwan;
2 Graduate Institute of Athletics and Coaching Science, National Taiwan Sport University, Taoyuan, Taiwan

AIM: The aim of this paper was to examine the effects of training using Xbox Kinect on agility and balance in healthy young adults.
METHODS: Forty-three healthy adults (aged 20 to 30 years) were randomized to either an intervention or control group. The intervention group played Xbox Kinect 3 times per week, for an average of 20 minutes per session for 6 weeks. The control group did not play Xbox Kinect. All the participants completed assessments of agility and balance at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 weeks.
RESULTS: After 6 weeks of training the intervention group showed significant improvement in agility at 2 weeks and showed continued improvement at 4 and 6 weeks (P<0.05). Dynamic balance in the medial and posterior directions also began to improve in the intervention group at 2 weeks and showed continued improvement at 4 and 6 weeks (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the intervention and control group in static balance (P=0.538).
CONCLUSION: A 6-week active video game training program appears to be effective in improving agility and dynamic balance in the medial and posterior directions in healthy young adults.

language: English


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