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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 September;55(9):899-904

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Combined isometric and vibration training does not enhance strength beyond that of isometric training alone

Fisher J., Van-dongen M., Sutherland R.

Centre for Health Exercise and Sport Science, Southampton Solent University, Southampton, UK

AIM: Research considering combined vibration and strength training is extensive yet results are equivocal. However, to date there appears no research which has considered the combination of both direct vibration and whole-body vibration when used in an isometric deadlift position. The aim of this study was to compare groups performing isometric training with and without direct and whole-body vibration.
METHODS: Twenty four participants (19-24 years) were randomly divided into: isometric training with vibration (ST+VT: N.=8), isometric training without vibration (ST: N.=8), and control (CON: N.=8). Within the training groups participants trained twice per week, for 6 weeks, performing 6-sets of maximal isometric deadlift contractions, increasing in duration from 30 seconds to 40 seconds (weeks 1-6). Hip and knee angle was maintained at 60° and 110°, respectively for both testing and training. Training sessions for ST+VT were identical to ST with the addition of a direct vibratory stimulus through hand-held straps and whole-body vibration via standing on vibration a platform. The amplitude remained constant (2 mm) throughout the intervention whilst the frequency increased from 35Hz to 50Hz. Pre- and post-test isometric strength was measured using an isometric deadlift dynamometer.
RESULTS: Results revealed significant increases in isometric strength for both ST+VT (P<0.001, 23.8%) and ST (P<0.001, 32.5%) compared to CON, with no significant differences between ST+VT and ST training groups.
CONCLUSION: The present study provides evidence to suggest that there are no greater gains to be incurred by the addition of a vibratory stimulus to traditional strength training.

language: English


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