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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 July-August;55(7-8):797-804

language: English

Effect of reduced coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol) supplementation on blood pressure and muscle damage during kendo training camp: a double-blind, randomized controlled study

Kizaki K. 1, Terada T. 1, Arikawa H. 1, Tajima T. 2, Imai H. 3, Takahashi T. 1, Era S. 1

1 Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Gifu, Japan;
2 Department of Physical Education, National Defense Academy, Yokosuka, Japan;
3 Department of Health and Physical Education, Faculty of Education, Gifu University, Gifu, Japan


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AIM: This randomized controlled study was designed to examine the effects of reduced coenzyme Q10 (ubiquinol; CoQ10) supplementation on blood pressure (BP) and exercise-induced muscle damage in kendo athletes during a 4-day kendo training camp.
METHODS: In a double-blinded manner, 32 young kendo athletes were randomly assigned to supplement with either placebo or CoQ10 (600 mg) daily for 11 days from 1 week prior to camp to end of camp. BP was measured every morning after waking up during the training camp. Blood samples were taken at 3 time points; 1 week and 1 day prior and upon completion of training camp at 17:30. Statistical analysis was performed by repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by Bonferroni/Dunn post-hoc tests.
RESULTS: Before the training camp started, there were no differences in diastolic BP between these groups. However, after kendo training started, diastolic BP in the CoQ10 group was significantly lower than that in the placebo group (P<0.05). Plasma creatine kinase (CK) and myoglobin (Mb) concentrations were significantly increased in both groups during the camp (P<0.05), whereas there were no significant differences in CK and Mb between CoQ10 and placebo groups (CK: P=0.82, Mb: P=0.69).
CONCLUSION: Oral supplementation with reduced form of CoQ10 (ubiquinol; Kaneka QHTM) showed a significant hypotensive effect in young male kendo athletes during a 4-day kendo training camp, although it did not significantly ameliorate kendo exercise-induced muscle damage.

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era@gifu-u.ac.jp