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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 July-August;55(7-8):708-13

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

A comparison of upper and lower body energetics during high-intensity exercise

Harvey L. 1, Wiegand A. 1, Solomon C. 1, Mclellan C. 2, Lovell D. I. 1

1 School of Health and Sport Sciences, Faculty of Science, Health and Education, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, QLD, Australia;
2 Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University, Robina, QLD, Australia

AIM: The aim of the present study was to measure and compare the aerobic, anaerobic alactic and anaerobic lactic energy system contribution during the 30-sec Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT) for the upper and lower body within the same individuals.
METHODS: Physically active men (N.=14) completed two WAnTs on an electronic arm ergometer and a cycle ergometer separated by three days. A fly wheel braking force corresponding to 5% and 7.5% of the participants body weight was used for the upper and lower body WAnTs respectively. Oxygen uptake and blood lactate were measured before, during and after both WAnTs, and body composition was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA).
RESULTS: The anaerobic lactic energy system contribution was significantly (P<0.01) higher during the upper body (60.3±5.6%) compared to the lower body (46.9±6.9%) WAnT. The contribution of the anaerobic alactic system was significantly higher (P<0.01) during the lower body (36.5±6.3%) compared to the upper body (28.3±4.9%) WAnT, with the aerobic system contribution significantly (P<0.05) higher for the lower body (16.8±2.5%) compared to the upper body (11.4±1.4%) WAnT.
CONCLUSION: The anaerobic lactic energy system provides over 60% of the energy requirements during an upper body WAnT but provides less the 50% during the lower body WAnT. In contrast, the aerobic and anaerobic alactic energy system contribution was significantly less for the upper body WAnT compared to the lower body WAnT.

language: English


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