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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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ORIGINAL ARTICLES  CLINICAL MEDICINE


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 June;55(6):663-7

language: English

Relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness, habitual physical activity, body mass index and premenstrual symptoms in collegiate students

Haghighi E. S., Jahromi M. K., Daryano Osh F.

Physical Education and Sports Science Department, College of Education and Psychology, Shiraz University, Shiraz, Iran


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AIM: Several factors may be related to premenstrual symptoms (PMS) including physical and psychological symptoms and the aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), habitual physical activity including exercise and non exercise activity, body mass index (BMI) and physical and psychological symptoms of PMS.
METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey 86 young girls (age:18-25 years) who met the study criteria voluntary participated in this study. Participants completed Moos Menstrual Distress and life style habit questionnaires. CRF was calculated using the Bruce treadmill test. Weight and height of participants were recorded for estimating body mass index. The Pearson correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis were used for analysis of the data.
RESULTS: CRF was significantly negatively correlated with physical and psychological symptoms of PMS (P<0.05); exercise activity was significantly and negatively correlated with physical and psychological symptoms (P<0.05). BMI was significantly and positively correlated with physical and psychological symptoms (P<0.05), but non-exercise activity was not associated with physical or psychological symptoms of PMS (P>0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: The higher level of CRF and exercise activity was related to lower but higher BMI was related to higher PMS symptoms. CRF was the strongest predictor of physical and psychological symptoms of PMS.

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