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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 May;55(5):397-404

EXCERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

A 5-week whole body vibration training improves peak torque performance but has no effect on stretch reflex in healthy adults: a randomized controlled trial

Yeung S. S., Yeung E. W.

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong

AIM: This study aimed to investigate the neuromuscular adaptation following a 5-week high frequency and low amplitude whole body vibration (WBV) exercise training.
METHODS: The study is a prospective, double blind, randomized controlled intervention design with a total of 19 subjects volunteered to participate in the study. They were randomly assigned either to WBV exercise training or control group. Both groups participated in a 5-week training program. The intervention group received WBV in semi-squat position on a device with an amplitude of 0.76 mm, frequency of 40Hz, and peak acceleration of 23.9 m/s2. Each vibration training session consisted of 6 series of 60s on with 30s rest period in between. The control group underwent the same statically mini-squatting position without exposure to WBV. The effectiveness of the vibration program was evaluated by vertical jump test and the isokinetic knee extensor peak torque. The possible neural factors that contributed to the improved muscular performance were evaluated by the stretch induced knee jerk reflex.
RESULTS: WBV training significantly enhanced the isokinetic knee extensor peak torque performance. Two-way mixed repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant time effect of the changes in the peak torque (P=0.043) and the effect was significantly different between the intervention and control group (P=0.042). WBV did not affect vertical jump height, reflex latency of VL, EMGVL, and knee jerk angle.
CONCLUSION: The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that the improvement in the muscular performance when subjects exposed to WBV training is attributed by neuromuscular efficiency via modulation of the muscle spindle sensitivity.

language: English


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