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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2015 May;55(5):390-6

EXCERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

The importance of open- and closed-skill agility for team selection of adult male basketball players

Scanlan A. T. 1, 2, 3, Tucker P. S. 1, 2, 3, Dalbo V. J. 1, 2, 3

1 Institute for Health and Social Science Research, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia;
2 Human Exercise and Training Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia;
3 Clinical Biochemistry Laboratory, Central Queensland University, Rockhampton, Australia

AIM: Open-skill agility qualities have yet to be described in adult male basketball players. Further, the importance of open- and closed-skill agility for team selection remains unknown. Thus, this study aimed to: 1) describe the open- and closed-skill agility of adult male basketball players; and 2) compare these properties between starting and non-starting players.
METHODS: A cross-sectional between-group design was used. Six starting (playing time: 30.1±8.8 min; age: 30.5±4.8 years; height: 192.1±7.7 cm; body mass: 100.5±15.0 kg; VO2max: 48.4±6.6 mL∙kg-1∙min-1) and six non-starting (4.3±3.6 min; 21.3±5 years; 185.7±7.4 cm; 94.4±17.9 kg; 50.6±3.9 mL∙kg-1∙min-1) state-level basketball players completed multiple trials for the Change of Direction Speed Test (CODST) and Reactive Agility Test (RAT).
RESULTS: No statistically significant between-group differences were evident for CODST movement time (starters: 1.652±0.047 s; non-starters: 1.626±0.040 s, P=0.68), RAT response time (starters: 307.5±100.5 ms; non-starters: 426.5±140.7 ms, P=0.12), and RAT decision-making time (starters: 110.7±11.0 ms; non-starters: 147.3±14.2 ms, P=0.08). However, starters (2.001±0.051 s) possessed significantly (P=0.02) faster RAT total movement times than non-starters (2.182±0.040 s).
CONCLUSION: These data support the utility of perceptual and cognitive components of agility performance in distinguishing starting from non-starting players in basketball. Consequently, basketball coaching and conditioning staff should incorporate sport-specific reactive training drills for all players during the annual conditioning plan.

language: English


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