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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2014 December;54(6):725-9

Copyright © 2014 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The effect of pulsing movements on the physiological response to common exercises

Coleman K. 1, Vorndran B. 1, Reid G. 2, Womack C. J. 1

1 Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA, USA; 2 Rockingham Memorial Hospital Wellness Center, Harrisonburg, VA, USA


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AIM: There is a paucity of research on responses to exercises using pulsatile movements (PM) compared to using a full range of motion (FM). The purpose of the present study was to compare the physiological responses to PM vs. FM exercises.
METHODS: Eight participants completed two separate exercise sessions, comprised of three sets of 20 repetitions for five different exercises. During the FM trial, all repetitions were performed using a full range of motion. In the PM trial, half of the repetitions were performed using pulsing movements. Average VO2, total VO2, HR and RPE were compared using paired t-tests. Blood lactate [La-] responses were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance.
RESULTS: Average VO2 in the PM trial (1.52±0.38 L min-1) was similar to the FM trial (1.57±0.43 L min-1). However, total VO2 (PM=23.1±6.6 L, FM=27.2±6.9 L), average HR (PM=134.4 ± 10.9, FM=146.2±14.6 beats per min) and RPE (PM=12.2±0.9, FM=13.3±0.9) were significantly (P<0.05) lower for the PM trial. There were no significant differences in blood [La-] response (PM pre=1.7±0.8, post=6.1±0.8 mmol L-1; FM pre=1.6±0.4, post=6.8±0.5 mmol L-1).
CONCLUSION: FM exercises elicit higher HR and RPE responses compared to PM exercises; without corresponding increases in metabolic rate.

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womackcx@jmu.edu