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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2014 August;54(4):475-80

language: English

Cardiorespiratory, metabolic and hormonal responses during open-wheel indoor kart racing

Sperlich B. 1, Osman-Reinkens S. 2, Zinner C. 2, Krueger M. 2, Holmberg H.-C. 3

1 Department of Sport Science, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany;
2 Institute of Training Science and Sport Informatics, German Sport University, Cologne, Germany;
3 Swedish Winter Sports Research Centre, Department of Health Sciences, Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden


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AIM: This study aimed to quantify the cardiorespiratory, metabolic and hormonal responses of elite open-wheel indoor kart racers.
METHODS: Ten male racers (age: 21±3 yrs; height: 1.92±0.06 m, body mass: 76.0±5.9 kg) participated in a racing tournament. Their peak oxygen uptake and heart rate were assessed by a ramp test (100 W, increase 30 W·min-1) in the laboratory. During the racing itself, the cardio-respiratory and accelerometer values were recorded and pre- and post-race levels of blood lactate and salivary cortisol were determined.
RESULTS: The average peak values for all of the drivers with respect to oxygen uptake and heart rate were 4.5±0.8 L·min-1 (56.7±7.9 mL·min-1·kg-1) and 193±5 beats·min-1, respectively. Overall, 28.3±3.3 laps were completed during 30-min of racing. Acceleration forces for the entire test averaged 1.20±0.51 G (maximum: 3.30 G), declining from the first 10 min until the end of racing (P<0.03). The oxygen uptake (~20 mL·min-1·kg-1), heart rate (~133 beats·min-1), respiratory exchange ratio (~0.96) and ventilation (~70 L·min-1) observed indicated moderate cardio-respiratory responses. Blood lactate concentration was significantly higher after the race than before but remained at <2 mmol·L-1 (P<0.01; effect size: 1.62).
CONCLUSION: There were no differences between salivary cortisol levels before and after the race (P<0.06; effect size: 0.49). Directly after the race, the drivers rated their perceived exertion on Borg’s scale as 11.1±1.3. The present data revealed that the psycho-physical exertion associated with a 30-min open-wheel indoor kart race is moderate.

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billy.sperlich@uni-wuerzburg.de