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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2014 August;54(4):424-31

EXCERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

The relationship between an athlete’s maximal aerobic speed determined in a laboratory and their final speed reached during a field test (UNCa Test)

Cappa D. F. 1, García G. C. 2, Secchi J. D. 3, Maddigan M. E. 4

1 National University of Catamarca, Faculty of Health Science, Catamarca, Argentina;
2 Higher Institute of teacher training, San Rafael, Mendoza, Argentina;
3 River Plate Adventist University, Faculty of Physical Education, Liberator San Martín, Entre Ríos, Argentina;
4 School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada

AIM: The main purpose of this study was to apply a field test to predict the maximal aerobic speed (MAS) of an athlete using the same protocol done in a laboratory.
METHODS: Fourteen male subjects volunteered to participate in this study and were evaluated on four separate occasions. First, an anthropometric evaluation was carried out. Secondly, an aerobic test was done on the treadmill with a gass analyzer to measure the maximum oxygen consumption (VO2máx) and to calculate the MAS. Third, Unca test was evaluated again to confirm the reliability of the test. Finally, the participants were evaluated on field using the National University of Catamarca test (UNCa test).
RESULTS: The MAS reached on a treadmill 15.6±1.0 km·h-1 was significantly higher than that found during the field test 13,6 ± 1,1 km·h-1 (P=0.0001). However the relationship between the treadmill and the field test were highly correlated in all variables: speed: r=0.83, distance covered r= 0,81, test duration r=0.83.
CONCLUSION: If MAS found on a treadmill is considered to be “the gold-standard” to validate MAS on field, it can be said that the UNCa test underestimates speed.

language: English


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