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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2014 April;54(2):210-5

SPORTS PSYCHOLOGY 

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Influence of graded exercise therapy on anxiety levels and health-related quality of life in chronic fatigue syndrome

Klasnja A. 1, Grujic N. 1, Popadic Gacesa J. 1, Barak O. 1, Tomic S. 2, 3, Brkic S. 2, 3

1 Department of Physiology, Medical faculty University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia;
2 Clinic for Infectious Diseases Clinical Center Vojvodina, Vojvodina, Serbia;
3 Medical Faculty, University of Novi Sad Novi Sad, Serbia

Aim: The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine to what extent graded exercise therapy (GET) improves health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and anxiety levels in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS); and 2) to correlate scores of HRQOL and anxiety levels in CFS patients.
Methods: Anxiety and HRQOL were assessed in 26 CFS patients before and after 12 weeks of GET. Anxiety was measured using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire (STAI) and HRQOL using the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form questionnaire (SF-36).
Results: GET significantly decreased trait anxiety (STAI-T) levels in patients with CFS. Patients’ scores on SF-36 following GET showed higher levels of functioning, but only the “vitality” subscale scores showed a statistically significant difference. A negative correlation was present between all eight subscales of SF-36 and anxiety levels. The strongest negative correlation for both state and trait anxiety scores (STAI-S and STAI-T) was found with the scores on the “Limitations due to emotional problems” subscale of SF-36 (r=-0.69 and r=-0.55, respectively), while the weakest negative correlation was with the “Physical functioning” subscale scores (r=-0.30 and r=-0.31, respectively).
Conclusion: Graded exercise therapy has a positive effect on both physical and psychological state of CFS patients. GET can decrease anxiety and improve quality of life of CFS patients. CFS patients with higher state and trait anxiety levels have lower quality of life, and vice versa.

language: English


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