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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2014 February;54(1):1-8

Copyright © 2014 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The effect of anxiety about falling on selected physiological parameters with different rope protocols in sport rock climbing

Aras D., Akalan C.

School of Physical Education and Sports Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey


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Background: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of anxiety about falling on selected physiological parameters on the lead (LC) and top-rope climbing (TRC) methods. For this purpose the physical differences between the two methods have been eliminated and the effect of only the anxiety about falling on the physiological parameters has been studied.
Methods: A total of 26 intermediate level sport rock climbers, 22 male and 4 female with an average age of 27.73±6.67 yr have participated as volunteers in the study. The average height of the participants was 177±8.01 cm and body weight was 71.38±13.19 kg. Their average climbing age was 6.61±4.84 and lead climbing age was 5.71±4.35 yr. The participants have climbed the same route, one with LC and the other with the TRC method. 20 minutes before the climbing The Competitive State Anxiety Inventory – 2 (CSAI-2) was completed by each participant. The physiological parameters measured on both of the two climbing days were the HR, VE, VO2 mL.kg-1.min-1, RER and MET with a mobile gas analyzer.
Results: The difference between the results obtained in all the three subscales of the CSAI-2 average comparisons was found to be statistically significant. The cognitive anxiety and somatic anxiety points were found to be high in LC and self-confidence points to be low in LC. No statistically significant difference was found between the two climbing times. It suggests that the physical conditions could be equalized between the two methods. A statistically significant difference was found in the average comparisons of the VE, VO2 mL.kg-1.min-1, RER and MET values. Even though HR values are higher during lead climbing, HR difference between the two methods was not statistically significant.
Conclusion: Energy and oxygen consumption and the level of anxiety are greater during LC as compared to TRC.

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