Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2012 February;52(1) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2012 February;52(1):63-70

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  BODY COMPOSITION, NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2012 February;52(1):63-70

language: English

Vitamin E supplementation does not alter physiological performance at fixed blood lactate concentrations in trained runners

Cobley J. N., Marrin K.

Sport and Exercise Research Group, Department of Sport and Physical Activity, Edge Hill University Ormskirk, Lancashire, UK


PDF  


AIM:The aim of the study was to determine the direction of change in performance variables at fixed blood lactate concentrations following vitamin E (VE) supplementation.
METHODS:In a paired-matched design twelve (male: N.=8; female: N.=4) trained runners were allocated to a VE (N.=6; 268 mg·d-1) or placebo (N.=6; glucose: 30 mg·d-1) group for 35 days. Participants completed a discontinuous incremental exercise test, pre and post supplementation, to determine peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) running velocity and percentage of peak oxygen uptake (%(VO2peak) at the lactate threshold (TLAC) and the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA). Participants maintained a standardised training regime throughout the supplementation period.
RESULTS: VE supplementation failed to significantly enhance velocity at TLAC (P=0.91) and OBLA (P=0.22) compared to a placebo treatment. Analogously, VE did not significantly enhance %(VO2peak) at TLAC (P=0.85) and OBLA (P=0.71) compared to a placebo treatment. Whilst VE supplementation did not enhance performance it did not impair performance compared to a placebo. Training significantly enhanced velocity at TLAC (P=0.00) and OBLA (P=0.05). No training-induced improvements in %VO2peak at TLAC (P=0.06) and OBLA (P=0.40) were observed.
CONCLUSION: Daily VE supplementation for 35 days does not enhance or impair physiological performance at fixed blood lactate concentrations. Long-term VE supplementation for the purposes of performance enhancement is not recommended.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail

marrink@edgehill.ac.uk