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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2011 June;51(2):233-40

language: English

The effects of low and high glycemic index 24-h recovery diets on cycling time trial performance

Moore L. J. S., Midgley A. W., Vince R., Mcnaughton L. R.

Department of Sport, Health and Exercise Science, University of Hull, Hull, UK


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AIM: The present study investigated the effects of high and low glycemic index (GI) 24 h recovery meals on the physiological responses and subsequent athletic performance, following a glycogen depleting protocol.
METHODS:Ten well trained cyclists (age, 33.6±7.4y, height, 175.3±7.6 cm, weight 74.5±8.2 kg, and VO2max, 60.5±6.0 ml∙kg-1∙min-1) participated in two trials in a randomized cross- over design. On day 1, subjects performed a glycogen depleting protocol after which they then consumed either high or low GI recovery diets over the next 24 h, which provided 8 g.kgBW-1 of carbohydrate. On day 2, the subjects returned to the laboratory, 2- 3 h postprandial, to perform a 40 km time trial (TT) on the Velotron cyclePro© ergometer.
RESULTS: No difference was observed in TT performance times between the high GI (93. 5±9.29 min) trial and the low GI (90.7±11.1 min) trial (t=1.1; P=0.35). Additionally, no differences in carbohydrate (F=1.1, P=0.37) fat (F=1.1, P=0.40) oxidation or blood glucose concentration (F=0.9, P=0.5) was observed.
DISCUSSION:The results of the present study suggest that the ingestion of a high GI carbohydrate 24 h recovery diet following glycogen depleting exercise, has no greater effect on endurance performance than consuming a low GI carbohydrate 24 h recovery diet. It may be concluded from these results that, provided enough carbohydrate is consumed during a 24 h recovery period, there is no difference in subsequent endurance performance.

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l.mcnaughton@hull.ac.uk