Advanced Search

Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2011 March;51(1) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2011 March;51(1):128-35

ISSUES AND ARTICLES   MOST READ   eTOC

CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2011 March;51(1):128-35

EPIDEMIOLOGY AND CLINICAL MEDICINE 

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Barriers to adolescent girls’ participation in physical activity defined by physical activity levels

Zaragoza J. 1, Generelo E. 2, Julián J. A. 1, Abarca-Sos A. 1

1 Faculty of Social Sciences and Education, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain;
2 Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain

AIM: Perceived barriers were the single most powerful predictors of a change in health behaviours and the most consistent negative correlate of children’s actual physical activity (PA). The purpose of this study was to compare the perceived barriers of physical activity in 714 adolescent girls defined by physical activity levels.
METHODS: The final sample consisted of 714 adolescent, student girls. The age of these students ranged from12 to 15 years, with a mean age of 13.5±0.7 years. Perceived physical activity and perceived barriers to physical activity were measured using the Physical Self-Description Questionnaire and a Scale of Barriers that includes 17 units of barriers divided into two categories: intrapersonal barriers and environmental/contextual barriers.
RESULTS: In our study, girls with a low activity level perceived a greater number of barriers than those with a high activity level, more specifically three intrapersonal barriers and two environmental/contextual barriers. Girls with a low activity level reported greater barriers to physical activity than high-active girls for these barriers: don’t like physical activity (F=23.405, p=0.001), not good at physical activity and sports (F=24.160, p=0.001), I’m too lazy to do physical activity (F=8.415, P=0.001), it is not safe to do physical activity outdoors (F=11.39, P<0.001) and there is no-one to do physical activity with (F=15.22 P<0.001).
CONCLUSION: This study shows the need to learn and effectively use time management strategies that emphasize prioritising and better scheduling of physical activities.

language: English


FULL TEXT  REPRINTS

top of page