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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2009 March;49(1):105-11

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Acute incremental exercise to maximal performance does not cause alterations in serum oxidant levels of healthy young individuals

Amir O. 1, Yamin C. 2, Sagiv M. 2, Eynon N. 2, Shnizer S. 3, Kagan T. 4, Reznick A. Z. 4, Sagiv M. 2, Amir R. E. 2

1 Department of Cardiology Lady Davis Carmel Medical Center Haifa, Israel 2 Department of Genetics and Molecular Biology Zinman College of Physical Education and Sport Sciences Wingate Institute, Netanya, Israel 3 Lumitest Ltd, Haifa, Israel 4 Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology The Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel


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Aim. This study was designed to analyze serum oxidative stress (OS) levels in healthy young individuals performing a routine maximal aerobic exercise and to evaluate the correlation between OS levels and physiological parameters.
Methods. Serum OS levels were studied by thermochemiluminescence (TCL) parameters at rest and following maximal aerobic exercise in 85 healthy young subjects. Levels were measured by a real time on line TCL assay (higher TCL-Ratio and TCL-H3 = lower OS level).
Results. Aerobic capacity had no effect on baseline OS levels. Post-exercise OS levels correlated with maximal oxygen uptake (V.O2max) (P<0.005), delta V.O2 (V.O2max- V.O2rest) (P<0.005), anaerobic threshold (VTH) (P<0.01), and total oxygen uptake (especially .O2 after VTH), (P<0.005). TCL-Ratio was related to total running time (P<0.01), as well. Post-exercise OS levels for the whole study group did not vary from baseline values. However, individuals with higher fitness level (V.O2max >percentile 60) had significantly lower values of TCL-H3 (P=0.04) and tended to have lower TCL-Ratio, indicating they had elevated OS levels. In a multivariate analysis OS level was most affected by V.O2 after VTH (anaerobic phase of the test) (P=0.003; adjusted odds ratio of 3.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.55-7.48).
Conclusion. In conclusion, acute incremental exercise to maximal performance does not cause alterations in serum oxidant levels of healthy young individuals. In healthy individuals performing maximal aerobic exercise, OS levels correlate with maximal aerobic power.

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