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Original articles  BODY COMPOSITION, SPORT NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION (ergogenics)


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2008 March;48(1):76-82

Copyright © 2008 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The effect of diet and strength training on obese children’s physical self-concept

Yu C. C. W. 1, Sung R. Y. T. 1, Hau K. T. 2, Lam P. K. W. 3, Nelson E. A. S. 1, So R. C. H. 4

1 Department of Pediatrics The Chinese University of Hong Kong Shatin, NT, Hong Kong, China 2 Department of Educational Psychology The Chinese University of Hong Kong Shatin, NT, Hong Kong, China 3 Center for Clinical Trials and Epidemiological Research The Chinese University of Hong Kong Shatin, NT, Hong Kong, China 4 Hong Kong Sports Institute Shatin, NT, Hong Kong, China


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Aim. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 6-week diet and exercise program, with emphasis on strength training, on the physical self-concept, body composition, and physical fitness of young overweight and obese children.
Methods. Eighty-two overweight and obese children aged 8-11 years were randomized into a diet-only or a diet-and-strength training group. Self-concept, body composition and physical fitness were measured before and after the 6-week study period using the Physical Self Description Questionnaires (PSDQ), dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and standard fitness tests. Dietary intake was assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Total daily energy intake was significantly reduced in both groups with a trend of more reduction in the diet-only group.
Results. Both groups developed greater confidence in strength. Those in the diet-and-strength training group also improved their endurance self-concept. Body Mass Index (BMI) decreased significantly in both groups. Lean mass increased significantly in both groups but significantly more in the diet-and-strength training group (+0.8 kg vs +0.3 kg, P<0.05). Handgrip, shuttle run, sit-up, and push-up were significantly improved in both groups, to a significantly greater extent in the diet-and-strength training group.
Conclusion. These findings confirm the 6-week program of either diet-only or diet-and-strength training improved overweight/obese children’s self-perception of muscular strength and body composition. With the diet-and-strength training program, self-concept in endurance also improved and the gain in lean body mass was more than double that of the diet only group.

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