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Original articles  BODY COMPOSITION, SPORT NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION (ergogenics)


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2007 September;47(3):309-15

language: English

Differences and relationships between residual volumes measured on land and in water calculated from estimate equations

Demura S. 1, Yamaji S. 2, Nagasawa Y. 3

1 Faculty of Education, Kanazawa University Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan
2 Faculty of Medical Sciences University of Fukui, Yoshida-gun, Japan
3 Akita Prefectural University, Akita, Japan


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Aim. Residual volume error influences percent body fat estimated by hydrostatic. The aim of this study was to examine the differences and relationships between the residual volumes measured on land and in water and calculated from estimate equations developed in previous studies.
Methods. Participants: 20 males and 20 females, aged 18-25 years, participated in this study. Setting: the residual volumes on land and in water without submerging their head were measured twice in each setting. In addition, the residual volume was calculated from 6 estimate equations developed in previous studies.
Results. Residual volumes measured on land and in water have very good trial-to-trial reliabilities (intraclass correlation coefficients: <0.98), and high relationships, and did not show a significant difference. It is inferred that their difference is approximately 500 mL, being larger than trial-to-trial error. If we attach great importance to practicability rather than the above error, the residual volume on land can be used. There were no significant differences between measured volumes and those estimated by equation 5 in males and all equations except equation 6 in females. The relationships between measured and estimated residual volumes were poor in males except for equation 4, but were fair in females. Trial-to-trial reliability of residual volumes measured on land and in water is very good, and they have insignificant differences and high relationships.
Conclusion. Of 6 estimate equations, equation 4 calculated from vital capacity has high accuracy in both sexes.

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