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THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

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Original articles  BODY COMPOSITION, SPORT NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION (ergogenics)


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2006 June;46(2):281-5

language: English

Fluid loss and body composition of elite Kuwaiti soccer players during a soccer match

Al-Jaser T. A., Hasan A. A. A

Department of Physical Education and Sport College of Basic Education, Adailiya, Kuwait


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Aim. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the hot weather conditions of Kuwait on fluid loss (FL) and body composition of Kuwaiti soccer players.
Methods. During 5 preseason soccer games, 10 elite Kuwaiti soccer players participated in this study. The age and physical characteristics (mean±SD) of the subjects were: age 24±4.7 years; height 173.4±5.2 cm; mass 68.2±7 kg; and the percent body fat 12.3±3.7%, the mean temperature 45.4±2 °C, mean humidity was 23.6±4.2%. Measurements were taken at the beginning, half time, and the end of each game; FL was measured by body weight changes. Urine specific gravity was used to determine the state of hydration. Body composition was measured using Biodynamics Model 310e Body Composition Analyzer.
Results. There was a significant difference in body weight changes between 1st and 2nd half at P>0.05. The mean value of the FL at the end of the game was 3.1±1.4 L; indicating no significant difference in FL between 1st and 2nd half at P>0.05). The mean value urine specific gravity at the end game was 1.026±0.002; there was a significant difference between first, and second half for urine specific gravity (P>0.05).
Conclusion. Results of this study indicated that the subjects did not consume enough fluid to offset FL. Players and coaches involved with activities in hot humid environments should pay closer attention to FL and body weight changes which occur during physical activity. Special care should always be taken to insure players consume extra water prior to each training session or game.

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