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Original articles  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2006 March;46(1):52-6

Copyright © 2006 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effects of static stretching on leg power during cycling

O’connor D. M. 1, Crowe M. J. 2, Spinks W. L. 2

1 Faculty of Education and Social Work University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia 2 Institute of Sport and Exercise Science James Cook University, Townsville, Australia


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Aim. This study investigated the effects of warm-up involving static stretching on leg power. It was expected that the inclusion of static stretching in the warm-up would decrease leg power.
Methods. Twenty-seven healthy volunteers (16 male, 11 female) participated in the study. A prospective, repeated measures design was implemented where volunteers underwent 2 testing sessions at least 24 hours apart. One testing session involved a control warm-up (5 min submaximal cycling) followed by 4 10-s leg power tests at 5, 20, 40 and 60 min postwarm-up. For the other testing session, the subjects performed 5 min of submaximal cycling followed by 15 min of lower body static stretching and then the four leg power tests. Relative peak power, time to peak power and relative total work were measured for each leg power test.
Results. Peak power and total work were significantly greater after the static stretching warm-up compared to the control warm-up on all power tests. Peak power was achieved more quickly for the static stretching warm-up compared to the control warm-up on the 5 min test only.
Conclusion. A warm up that includes static stretching has beneficial effects on anaerobic power events in comparison to submaximal cycling alone.

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