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Original articles  SPORT PSYCOLOGY


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2005 June;45(2):208-12

language: English

Personality does not influence exercise-induced mood enhancement among female exercisers

Milton K. E. 1, Lane A. M. 1, Terry P. C. 2

1 Uni­ver­sity of Wol­ve­rhampton, Wa­lsall, UK
2 Uni­ver­sity of ­Southern Queens­land, Aus­tralia


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Aim. The ­present ­study inves­ti­gated the influ­ence of per­son­ality on exer­cise-­induced ­mood ­changes. It was hypo­the­sised ­that a) exer­cise ­would be asso­ciated ­with sig­nif­i­cant ­mood enhance­ment ­across all per­son­ality ­types, b) extro­ver­sion ­would be asso­ciated ­with pos­i­tive ­mood and neu­ro­ti­cism ­with neg­a­tive ­mood ­both pre- and ­post-exer­cise, and c) per­son­ality meas­ures ­would ­interact ­with exer­cise-­induced ­mood ­changes.
­Methods. Par­tic­i­pants ­were 90 ­female exer­cisers (M=25.8 y, SD=9.0 y) who com­pleted the ­Eysenck Per­son­ality Inven­tory ­once and the ­Brunel ­Mood ­Scale ­before and ­after a 60-­min exer­cise ses­sion. ­Median ­splits ­were ­used to ­group par­tic­i­pants ­into 4 per­son­ality ­types: ­stable intro­verts (n=25), ­stable extro­verts (n=20), neu­rotic intro­verts (n=26), and neu­rotic extro­verts (n=19).
­Results. ­Repeated meas­ures ­MANOVA ­showed sig­nif­i­cant ­mood enhance­ment fol­lowing exer­cise ­across all per­son­ality ­types. Neu­ro­ti­cism was asso­ciated ­with neg­a­tive ­mood ­scores pre- and ­post-exer­cise but the ­effect of extro­ver­sion on ­reported ­mood was rel­a­tively ­weak. ­There was no sig­nif­i­cant inter­ac­tion ­effect ­between exer­cise-­induced ­mood enhance­ment and per­son­ality.
Con­clu­sion. Find­ings ­lend sup­port to the ­notion ­that exer­cise is asso­ciated ­with ­improved ­mood. How­ever, find­ings ­show ­that per­son­ality did not influ­ence ­this ­effect, ­although neu­ro­ti­cism was asso­ciated ­with neg­a­tive ­mood.

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