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Original articles  BIOCHEMISTRY


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2005 March;45(1):112-20

language: English

Differences in blood lipids and apolipoproteins between master athletes, recreational athletes and sedentary men

Buyukyazi G.

School of Physical Education and Sports Celal Bayar University, Manisa, Turkey


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Aim. Studies related with the role of intensive and moderate training on reducing coronary heart disease (CHD) risks have revealed conflicting results. Thus, the aim of this study was to clarify the association between long-term physical training with competitive and recreational purposes and blood lipids and apolipoproteins in the middle-aged master athletes, recreational athletes and sedentary controls.
Methods. The association between long-term physical training and serum concentrations of lipids, lipoproteins, and apolipoproteins in the middle-aged men was investigated. Twelve male master athletes (MA), 12 male recreational athletes (RA) (>10 y), and 12 male sedentary controls (CG) participated in the study. Serum concentrations of lipids and lipoproteins were measured by enzymatic methods; apolipoproteins (ApoA1 and ApoB) and serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] were measured by immonoprecipitation assays.
Results. TC, LDL-C, ApoA1, Lp(a) levels and LDL-C/HDL-C ratio of the 3 groups did not show any significant differences. MA and RA had significantly higher levels of V.O2max, HDL-C, ApoA1/ApoB ratio; and lower values of percent body fat, resting heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, TG, ApoB and TC/HDL-C ratio than CG. We did not find any significant differences between MA and RA in any variables except for BMI and TC/HDL-C ratio.
Conclusion. Habitual physical training favorably altered serum lipid and apolipoprotein profiles. Although there was no statistical significance (except for BMI and TC/HDL-C) between MA and RA, a tendency to reduce the CHD risks was observed almost in all variables in favor of MA.

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