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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2003 December;43(4):535-8

PHARMACOLOGY 

    Original articles

Oral theophylline supplementation and high-intensity intermittent exercise

Pigozzi F., Sacchetti M., Di Salvo V., Alabiso A., Fagnani F., Parisi A.

University Institute of Movement Sciences (­IUSM), Rome Italy,

Aim. The ­present ­study was car­ried out to inves­ti­gate wheth­er ­oral theo­phyl­line sup­ple­men­ta­tion ­exerts an ergo­gen­ic ­effect dur­ing inter­mit­tent ­high-inten­sity exer­cise.
Methods. Ten ­healthy sub­jects under­took inter­mit­tent exer­cise (1 min ­cycling at 120% of V.O2max ­with 3 min of recov­ery ­until exhaus­tion). The exer­cise ­test was repeat­ed ­twice, 1 ­week ­apart. On ­each occa­sion, the sub­ject ingest­ed, in a dou­ble ­blind set­ting, ­either theo­phyl­line (4.5 mg/kg) or pla­ce­bo 90 min ­before com­menc­ing the exer­cise ­test.
Results. Three sub­jects ­could not com­plete ­both ­trials due to nau­sea and diz­zi­ness ­after theo­phyl­line had ­been admin­is­tered. Time to exhaus­tion in the remain­ing sub­jects was slight­ly ­increased ­after theo­phyl­line admin­is­tra­tion (55.9±6 min vs 59.3±5.9 min; p<0.05).
Conclusion. ­Present ­data indi­cate ­that ­oral theo­phyl­line sup­ple­men­ta­tion ­delays ­fatigue ­onset dur­ing inter­mit­tent ­high-inten­sity exer­cise. The ­effect, ­although sta­tis­ti­cal­ly sig­nif­i­cant, ­does not ­appear to be ­marked. The pos­sibil­ity of occur­rence of neg­a­tive ­side ­effects and the evi­dence for its ergo­gen­ic poten­tial sug­gests the neces­sity to ­include theo­phyl­line in the International Olympic Committee (IOC) World Antidoping Agency (­WADA) ­list as a ­banned or restrict­ed sub­stance.

language: English


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