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Original articles  EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 December;42(3):431-7

language: English

Physiological responses during and following karate training in women

Imamura H. 1, Yoshimura Y. 1, Nishimura S. 2, Nakazawa A. T. 3, Teshima K. 1, Nishimura C. 4, Miyamoto N. 1

1 Labor­a­tory of Nutri­tion and Exer­cise Phys­iology Depart­ment of ­Food and Nutri­tion Nak­a­mura ­Gakuen Uni­ver­sity, ­Fukuoka, ­Japan
2 Fed­er­a­tion of All ­Japan ­Karate-do Organ­iza­tions Tokyo, ­Japan
3 Uni­ver­sity of ­Alaska Fair­banks, USA
4 Nag­a­saki Pre­fec­tural Uni­ver­sity, Nag­a­saki, ­Japan


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Back­ground. The pur­pose of ­this ­study was to ­examine ­whether ­each exer­cise and an ­entire ­karate ­training ses­sion can ­achieve: 1) ­accepted ­training inten­sity thresh­olds for effec­tive ­aerobic ­capacity ­training; 2) ­energy expen­di­ture (EE) thresh­olds for ­total ­body ­mass and fat ­weight ­loss; and, 3) ele­va­tion in ­excess ­postexer­cise ­oxygen con­sump­tion (­EPOC).
­Methods. We inves­ti­gated phys­io­log­ical ­responses ­during 5 ­types of ­karate ­training in ­female ­karate prac­ti­tioners: ­basic tech­niques ­without (S-­Basics) and ­with (M-­Basics) move­ments, spar­ring tech­niques ­without (­TECH I) and ­with (­TECH II) an oppo­nent, and ­kata.
­Results. The ­mean per­cent of max­imum ­oxygen ­uptake ­reserve (%VO2R), per­cent of max­imum ­heart ­rate (%­HRmax), and max­imum ­heart ­rate ­reserve (%HRR) for S-­Basics ­were ­below the ­accepted ­threshold and for M-­Basics ­were mar­ginal or ­above the ­threshold for ­increasing VO2max. For ­TECH I, ­TECH II, ­kata, and the ­entire 70-min prac­tice, the ­mean %­HRmax and %HRR ­were ­well ­above the ­threshold, how­ever, %VO2R was ­below the ­threshold. ­Although the ­mean ­EPOC meas­ured for 5 min imme­di­ately fol­lowing the ­entire 70-min ­karate ­training did not ­differ ­from ­resting VO2. The ­blood lac­tate ­responses to the 5 ­types of ­karate exer­cises ­ranged ­from 1.2±0.3 to 2.2±0.8 ­mmol·L-1. The ­mean EE for ­each ­karate exer­cise ­ranged ­from 157±10 kJ to 314±16 kJ. The ­mean EE for the ­entire 70 min prac­tice and ­EPOC ­were 1120±64 kJ and 28±2 kJ, respec­tively.
Con­clu­sions. The ­training inten­sities of ­karate exer­cises ­studied in ­women ­were ­light to mod­erate, ­effects of ­karate ­training on ­EPOC was min­imal, and the ­mean EE was mar­ginal to the ­accepted ­threshold for ­total ­body ­mass and fat ­weight ­loss.

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