Advanced Search

Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 June;42(2) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 June;42(2):250-5

ISSUES AND ARTICLES   MOST READ   eTOC

CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 June;42(2):250-5

BIOCHEMISTRY 

    Original articles

Screening blood tests in members of the Israeli National Olympic team

Eliakim A. 1, 2, Nemet D. 2, Constantini N. 1

1 The Rib­stein ­Center for ­Sport Med­i­cine Sci­ences and ­Research, Win­gate Insti­tute, ­Netanya, ­Israel
2 Child ­Health and ­Sports ­Center, Pedi­atric Depart­ment, Meir Gen­eral Hos­pital, ­Sapir Med­ical ­Center, ­Kfar-­Saba, Tel-­Aviv Uni­ver­sity, ­Tel-Aviv, Israel

Back­ground. ­Blood sam­ples are fre­quently col­lected in ­elite ath­letes in ­order to ­screen for pos­sible med­ical con­di­tions ­that ­might ­affect ­their ath­letic per­for­mance. How­ever, the ­extent of ­these ­blood ­screening pro­grams is not ­known.
­Methods. ­Blood sam­ples ­were col­lected ­from all mem­bers of the ­Israeli ­National ­Olympic ­team (n=114; 75 ­males, 39 ­females, ­mean age 23.4±0.5 ­years) to ­screen for pos­sible med­ical con­di­tions ­that ­might ­affect ­their ath­letic per­for­mance. All the ath­letes par­tic­i­pated in indi­vidual ­sports. ­Fasting, ­early ­morning ­blood was sam­pled ­from all the ath­letes ­during the ­early ­phases of the ­training ­season (­period of rel­a­tively ­light ­training). ­Blood was col­lected for eryth­ro­cyte sed­i­men­ta­tion ­rate, com­plete ­blood ­count, chem­istry ­panel, ­lipid pro­file, and ­iron ­stores anal­ysis.
­Results. Fif­teen ath­letes (13%; 9 ­females, 6 ­males) had low fer­ritin ­levels (<20 ng/ml) indi­cating ­decreased ­iron ­stores. ­Four of ­these ath­letes (3.5%) had ­overt ­iron defi­ciency ­anemia. Two ­other ath­letes had B12 defi­ciency ­anemia. ­Three ath­letes had ele­vated ­serum crea­ti­nine and ­urea. Sur­pris­ingly, ele­vated ­levels of cho­les­terol (>200 mg/dl) ­were ­found in 15 ath­letes (13%). More­over, 24 ath­letes (21%) had ­mild low HDL-cho­les­terol ­levels. No elec­tro­lyte abnor­mal­ities ­were ­found.
Con­clu­sions. Eval­u­a­tion of ­iron ­stores ­should be per­formed in ­elite ath­letes, due to the rel­a­tively ­high prev­a­lence of ­depleted ­iron ­stores and ­iron defi­ciency ­anemia, ­which may ­affect ­their ath­letic per­for­mance. We sug­gest ­that ­renal func­tion ­should be ­tested in ath­letes ­prior to the use of ­food sup­ple­ments and/or med­i­ca­tions ­that may inter­fere ­with ­their ­renal func­tion. Fur­ther ­studies are ­needed to deter­mine the ben­e­fits of ­screening ­tests in ­elite ath­letes.

language: English


FULL TEXT  REPRINTS

top of page