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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 June;42(2):198-206

SPORT INJURIES AND REHABILITATION 

    Original articles

Characteristics of stress fractures in young athletes under 20 years

Ohta-Fukushima M., Mutoh Y., Takasugi S. *, Iwata H. **, Ishii S. ***

From the Depart­ment of Phys­i­cal and ­Health Edu­ca­tion Grad­u­ate ­School of Edu­ca­tion The Uni­ver­sity of ­Tokyo, ­Tokyo, ­Japan
*Depart­ment of Ortho­pe­dic Sur­gery Kyu­shu Uni­ver­sity ­School of Med­i­cine Fukuo­ka, ­Japan
**Depart­ment of Ortho­pe­dic Sur­gery Nagoya Uni­ver­sity ­School of Med­i­cine Nagoya, ­Japan
***Depart­ment of Ortho­pe­dic Sur­gery Sap­po­ro Med­i­cal Uni­ver­sity Sap­po­ro, ­Japan

Back­ground. ­With the pop­u­lar­iza­tion of orga­nized ­sports ­among ado­les­cents and chil­dren, the clin­i­cal cas­es of ­stress frac­tures in ­young ath­letes ­have ­increased. ­This ­study was car­ried out to inves­ti­gate the char­ac­ter­is­tics of ­stress frac­tures in ­young ath­letes.
Meth­ods. Dur­ing the 18-­month peri­od ­between Jan­u­ary 1996 and ­June 1997, new clin­i­cal cas­es of ­stress frac­ture due to ­sports activ­ities ­were col­lect­ed ­from 39 hos­pi­tals in ­Japan.
­Results. We ana­lyzed 222 ­stress frac­tures in 208 ath­letes ­under 20 ­years of age (108 ­males: 14.4±2.2 ­years, 100 ­females: 15.2±1.5 ­years). ­Among ­these cas­es, the ­peak age of occur­rence was 16. The ­most com­mon ­sport caus­ing ­stress frac­ture was bas­ket­ball. The tib­ia was the ­most com­mon loca­tion. ­About 70% of the ­patients par­tic­i­pat­ed in the respec­tive ­sport for 6 or 7 ­days per ­week. ­High ­school stu­dents ­trained sig­nif­i­cant­ly ­more ­often ­than the pri­mary and jun­ior ­high ­school stu­dents (p<0.0001). ­There was a sta­tis­ti­cal­ly sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ence in the ­return ­time to the ­sport ­between the cas­es who vis­it­ed a hos­pi­tal with­in 3 ­weeks and ­those who wait­ed for ­more ­than 3 ­weeks ­after the ­onset of symp­toms (­return ­time, 10.4 vs 18.4 wks). Sev­er­al cas­es vis­it­ed a hos­pi­tal ­beyond 8 ­weeks ­after the ­onset of symp­toms regard­less of the con­tin­u­ous ­pain of ­stress frac­ture, and ­their recov­ery was pro­longed.
Con­clu­sions. It is impor­tant to edu­cate ­young ath­letes ­that con­tin­u­ous ­pain last­ing ­over 3 ­weeks is a warn­ing sig­nal to the ­body, and ­that ear­ly diag­no­sis ­leads to ear­ly recov­ery.

language: English


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