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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 June;42(2):172-8

EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY AND BIOMECHANICS 

    Original articles

Competition between internal and external sources of information during exercise: influence on RPE and the impact of the exercise load

Nethery V. M.

From the Exercise Science Laboratory Department of Physical Education, Health, and Leisure Services Central Washington University Ellensburg, WA, USA

Background. The pur­pose of ­this ­study was to inves­ti­gate the influ­ence of the exer­cise set­ting on per­ceived exer­tion dur­ing sus­tained low and ­high inten­sity ­cycling exer­cise.
Methods. Thirteen ­untrained ­males com­plet­ed 4 15-min ­cycling ses­sions at 50% ˙VO2­peak and at 80% ˙VO2­peak ­under ­each of the fol­low­ing con­di­tions: con­trol, sen­so­ry ­deprived, vid­eo, and ­music. Ratings of per­ceived exer­tion (RPE) ­from Borg’s 6-20 ­scale and ­heart ­rate (HR) ­were record­ed at 5 min inter­vals dur­ing all ses­sions.
Results. RPE ­increased ­with exer­cise dura­tion at ­both inten­sities and, as expect­ed, was sub­stan­tial­ly high­er at the hard­er work­load. Exercising to ­music result­ed in sig­nif­i­cant­ly low­er RPE ­when com­pared to all oth­er con­di­tions at ­both the low and ­high work­loads, ­while RPE was high­er in the sen­so­ry ­deprived con­di­tion ­when com­pared to the oth­er 3 con­di­tions. However, RPE was sim­i­lar for the con­trol and vid­eo con­di­tions at ­both work­loads. A sig­nif­i­cant ordi­nal inter­ac­tion exist­ed ­between con­di­tions and exer­cise dura­tion dur­ing the low but not the ­high work­load. While HR was high­er for the hard­er work­load and ­increased dur­ing ­each work­load as a func­tion of exer­cise dura­tion, it was not dif­fer­ent ­among the 4 con­di­tions at ­either work­load.
Conclusions. Varying the ­type of sen­so­ry infor­ma­tion avail­able to the exer­cis­ing indi­vid­u­al did influ­ence per­cep­tu­al respons­es to the exer­cise ­with the ­degree of influ­ence depen­dent on the inten­sity and dura­tion of the exer­cise. These ­results are con­sis­tent ­with infor­ma­tion pro­cess­ing mod­els ­that sug­gest a lim­it­ed capac­ity to ­attend to the infor­ma­tion avail­able. The ­type of infor­ma­tion avail­able, the ­work inten­sity, and the ­work dura­tion ­were impor­tant ele­ments influ­enc­ing per­cep­tu­al respons­es to exer­cise.

language: English


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