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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 March;42(1):89-91

CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM 

    Case reports

Partial absence of pericardium in an endurance athlete. A case report

Enad J. G.

From the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth, Virginia, USA

A twen­ty-­nine-­year-old com­pet­i­tive endu­rance run­ner was not­ed to ­have a con­gen­i­tal ­absence of the per­i­car­di­um on a rou­tine screen­ing ­exam. No rec­om­men­da­tions for activ­ity restric­tions ­have ­been pre­vi­ous­ly ­described for ­this con­di­tion. After max­i­mal exer­cise per­for­mance on a ­cadiac ­stress ­test with­out symp­toms of car­diac com­pro­mise and con­sul­ta­tion ­with car­di­ol­o­gists and car­di­oth­o­rac­ic sur­geons, the ­patient was ­returned to ­full, unre­strict­ed com­pet­i­tive run­ning. Once the diag­no­sis of ­absent per­i­car­di­um is con­firmed by imag­ing modal­ities, car­diac ­stress test­ing may be ­employed to deter­mine a rec­om­mend­ed activ­ity lev­el for the ­patient.

language: English


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