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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 March;42(1):71-8

BODY COMPOSITION, SPORT NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION 

 Original articles

Bench/step training with and without extremity loading. Effects on muscular fitness, body composition profile, and psychological affect

Engels H.-J., Currie J. S., Lueck C. C *, Wirth J. C.

From the Divi­sion of HPR - Exer­cise Sci­ence, Wayne ­State Uni­ver­sity, ­Detroit, Mich­igan, USA
*Phys­ical ­Therapy Depart­ment, Mount Cle­mens Gen­eral Hos­pital, ­Mount Cle­mens, Mich­igan, USA

Back­ground. To ­study the ­effect of ­bench/­step ­group exer­cise ­with and ­without ­extremity ­loading on mus­cular fit­ness, ­body com­po­si­tion, and psy­cho­log­ical ­affect.
­Methods. Experi­mental ­design: a pros­pec­tive ­training ­study. Set­ting: gen­eral com­mu­nity fit­ness ­center. Par­tic­i­pants: 44 ­healthy ­adult ­females (age: 21-51 yrs). Inter­ven­tions: 12 ­weeks of ­bench/ ­step exer­cise (3 ses­sions/­week, 50 min/ses­sion, 60-90% ­HRmax). Sub­jects ­were ran­domly ­assigned to ­groups ­that ­trained ­with (WT, n=16) and ­without (NWT, n=16) 0.68 kg/­ankle and 1.36 kg/­hand ­weights ­while 12 sub­jects ­served as non-­training con­trols (NTC). Meas­ures: pre- and post­inter­ven­tion mus­cular ­strength and endu­rance for ­knee and ­elbow ­flexion and exten­sion, and for ­shoulder abduc­tion and adduc­tion ­were exam­ined by iso­ki­netic dyna­mom­etry. ­Body com­po­si­tion was ­assessed ­with hydro­static ­weighing and psy­cho­log­ical ­affect by ques­tion­naire.
­Results. ­Thirty-two sub­jects com­pleted the ­study. ­ANOVA ­revealed ­that pre- to ­postinter­ven­tion ­changes for ­body fat (2.6%), fat-­free ­weight (+0.7 kg), fat ­weight (-1.9 kg), and ­knee ­flexion ­peak ­torque ­were sig­nif­i­cantly dif­ferent in the ­bench/step exer­cise ­trained (WT+NWT) com­pared to the NTC ­study ­group. Spe­cific com­par­i­sons of ­muscle ­strength and endu­rance ­change ­scores of WT+NWT rel­a­tive to NTC, and of WT rel­a­tive to NWT ­revealed no ­other sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­ences ­between ­groups. Pos­i­tive and neg­a­tive affec­tive ­states ­were sim­ilar ­among ­study ­groups ­before and ­after the inter­ven­tion.
Con­clu­sions. Par­tic­i­pa­tion in ­bench/­step ­group exer­cise ­improved ­body com­po­si­tion but was of lim­ited or no ­value as a ­modality to ­change mus­cular fit­ness and psy­cho­log­ical ­affect in ­healthy ­adult ­females. The use of ­ankle and ­hand ­weights ­failed to ­enhance ­training adap­ta­tions.

language: English


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