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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
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Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2002 March;42(1):56-64

BODY COMPOSITION, SPORT NUTRITION AND SUPPLEMENTATION 

    Original articles

Physiological responses to weight-loss intervention in inactive obese African-American and Caucasian women

Glass J. N., Miller W. C., Szymanski L. M., Fernhall B., Durstine J. L. *

From the Exercise Science Programs The George Washington University Medical Center Washington, D.C., USA
*Department of Exercise Science University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA

Background. The phys­io­log­i­cal respons­es of inac­tive ­obese pre­men­o­pau­sal African-American and Caucasian wom­en to the iden­ti­cal exer­cise train­ing and behav­ior mod­ifi­ca­tion pro­gram ­were com­pared.
Methods. Inactive ­obese (96.1±2.9 kg, BMI=34.8±0.7 kg/m2, % ­body fat=46.0±0.8; ­mean±SEM) pre­men­o­pau­sal (36±2 yrs) African-American (n=10) and Caucasian (n=19) wom­en ­were includ­ed. Resting meta­bol­ic ­rate (RMR), res­pir­a­to­ry ­exchange ­ratio (RER), and max­i­mal aero­bic pow­er (V.O2max) ­were meas­ured by indi­rect cal­o­rim­e­try, and ­body com­po­si­tion by ple­thys­mog­ra­phy. Resting and max­i­mal ­heart ­rates, ­blood glu­cose and lip­ids, and ­blood pres­sure ­were ­also meas­ured. Treatment con­sist­ed of a 13-­week ­diet and exer­cise behav­ior mod­ifi­ca­tion pro­gram. Group ­mean com­par­i­sons ­were ­made ­with a Student’s “t”-­test or an ANCO­VA, ­which con­trolled for indi­vid­u­al dif­fer­enc­es in ­body ­mass and ­lean ­body ­mass (LBM). Significance was set at p<0.05.
Results. Initially, the ­groups ­were not sig­nif­i­cant­ly dif­fer­ent in ­height, ­mass, BMI, age, % ­body fat, fat ­mass, LBM, ­girth meas­ure­ments, RMR, ­RER, V.O2max, ­blood pres­sure, or cho­les­te­rol pro­file. The num­ber of ­weeks com­plet­ed, num­ber of exer­cise ses­sions com­plet­ed, ­total min­utes of exer­cise for the ­entire inter­ven­tion, aver­age min­utes of dai­ly exer­cise, and ­total esti­mat­ed exer­cise ener­gy expen­di­ture ­were all sim­i­lar ­between ­groups. Furthermore, ­both ­groups report­ed sim­i­lar die­tary com­pli­ance. Both ­groups ­reduced ­body ­mass, BMI, LBM, ­girth meas­ure­ments, and ­increased V.O2max (mlO2·kg-1·min-1) sig­nif­i­cant­ly and sim­i­lar­ly.
Conclusions. African-American and Caucasian women ­respond the ­same phys­io­log­i­cal­ly to ­weight ­loss inter­ven­tion. The high­er prev­a­lence in obes­ity for African-American women is not due to a dif­fer­ent phys­io­log­i­cal ­response to ­diet and exer­cise.

language: English


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