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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2001 March;41(1):68-72

 Original articles

Grip strength measurement in competitive ten-pin bowlers

Tan B., Aziz A. R., Teh K. C., Lee H. C.

From the Sports Medicine and Research Centre Singapore Sports Council, Singapore

Background. In an ­attempt to ­find a ­more spe­cif­ic ­grip ­strength ­test for bowl­ers, the con­ven­tion­al ­grip ­strength ­test was mod­i­fied ­such ­that ­only the fin­gers ­used in hold­ing the ­ball are test­ed. The objec­tive of ­this ­study was to ­assess the ­test-­retest reli­abil­ity of ­this mod­i­fied bowl­ing ­grip ­strength ­test, to ­assess the agree­ment ­between the bowl­ing and the con­ven­tion­al ­grip ­strength ­tests, and to exam­ine the cor­re­la­tion ­between the mod­i­fied ­test and bowl­ing per­for­mance in com­pet­i­tive bowl­ers.
Methods. Experimental ­design: this ­research was con­duct­ed in two ­parts, ­each ­with a dif­fer­ent ­study sam­ple. Study I was a ­cross-sec­tion­al ­study to ­assess the cor­re­la­tion ­between the bowl­ing ­grip ­strength and the bowl­ing ­score. Study II was a com­par­a­tive ­study to ­obtain the ­test-­retest reli­abil­ity for ­both the bowl­ing and con­ven­tion­al ­grip ­strength ­tests, and to ­assess the agree­ment ­between the two ­tests. Setting and sub­jects: for ­study I, the sub­jects ­were 39 mem­bers (26 ­males and 13 ­females) of the Singapore National Ten-Pin Bowling Training Squad. Bowling ­grip ­strength was meas­ured with­in one ­month ­prior to the selec­tion ­trials for the nation­al ­squad, the ­results of ­which ­were ­used as a meas­ure of bowl­ing per­for­mance. For ­study II, the sub­jects ­were 21 mem­bers (12 ­males and 9 ­females) of the Singapore National Ten-Pin Bowling Squad ­that was ­formed ­after the selec­tion ­trials. Interventions: ­none. Measures: bowl­ing ­grip ­strength, con­ven­tion­al ­grip ­strength, and bowl­ing ­score.
Results. The ­test-­retest reli­abil­ity of the bowl­ing ­grip ­strength meas­ure­ment (r=0.91, p<0.01) was com­par­able to ­that of the con­ven­tion­al ­five-fin­ger ­grip (r=0.93, p<0.01). The sin­gle meas­ure intra­class cor­re­la­tion coef­fi­cient ­between the bowl­ing and con­ven­tion­al ­grip ­strength ­tests was 0.77; the 95% con­fi­dence inter­val was 0.51 and 0.90. However, the cor­re­la­tion coef­fi­cient ­between the bowl­ing ­grip ­strength ­test and bowl­ing ­score (r=0.27) was not sig­nif­i­cant.
Conclusions. The bowl­ing ­grip ­strength ­test has a ­high ­test-­retest reli­abil­ity, and a mod­er­ate agree­ment ­with the con­ven­tion­al ­grip ­strength ­test. However, ­despite ­using ­only the bowl­ing fin­gers, the ­test was ­unable to pre­dict bowl­ing per­for­mance in ­elite bowl­ers.

language: English


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