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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 2000 December;40(4):297-302

language: English

Energy expen­di­ture dur­ing walk­ing and jog­ging

Greiwe J. S., Kohrt W. M.

Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA


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Background. The aim of ­this inves­ti­ga­tion was to com­pare the phys­io­log­i­cal and sub­jec­tive respons­es dur­ing tread­mill walk­ing and jog­ging at sev­er­al cor­re­spond­ing ­speeds in phys­i­cal­ly ­active ­young wom­en.
Methods. Experimental ­design: Maximal oxy­gen ­uptake was deter­mined dur­ing a con­tin­u­ous tread­mill ­test to exhaus­tion. The walk­ing pro­to­col con­sist­ed of tread­mill walk­ing for ­five min at ­each of the fol­low­ing ­speeds: 4.0, 5.6, 7.2, 8.0, 8.8, 9.6 and 10.4 km·hr-1. The jog­ging pro­to­col con­sist­ed of tread­mill walk­ing for ­five min at 4.0, and 5.6 km·hr-1 and tread­mill jog­ging for ­five min at ­each of the fol­low­ing ­speeds: 7.2, 8.0, 8.8, 9.6 and 10.4 km·hr-1. Setting: This ­research was per­formed at Washington University School of Medicine. Participants: Fifteen ­healthy wom­en (­mean±SE, age; 26.9±1.4 yrs, BMI; 22.5±0.70, V.O2max; 41.9±1.9 ml·hr-1·min-1) per­formed a max­i­mal tread­mill exer­cise ­test, a walk­ing ­test and a jog­ging ­test.
Results. The ­rate of oxy­gen con­sump­tion, cal­cu­lat­ed ener­gy expen­di­ture per dis­tance (kJ·hr-1·­mile-1) and ­heart ­rates ­were sig­nif­i­cant­ly high­er dur­ing walk­ing com­pared to jog­ging at tread­mill ­speeds ≥8.8 km·hr-1. Plasma lac­tate con­cen­tra­tion and res­pir­a­to­ry ­exchange ­ratio ­were sig­nif­i­cant­ly high­er at tread­mill ­speeds ≥8.0 km·hr-1 dur­ing walk­ing as com­pared to jog­ging. Subjects sub­jec­tive­ly rat­ed ­their exer­tion dur­ing walk­ing as ­being sig­nif­i­cant­ly great­er ­when com­pared to jog­ging ­across the ­range of over­lap­ping tread­mill ­speeds.
Conclusions. These find­ings dem­on­strat­ed ­that walk­ing at ­speeds ≥ 8.0 km·hr-1 result­ed in ­rates of ener­gy expen­di­ture ­that ­were as ­high or high­er ­than jog­ging at the ­same ­speeds. Also, the high­er ­rates of ener­gy expen­di­ture dur­ing walk­ing as com­pared to jog­ging at ­speeds great­er ­than 8.0 km·hr-1 ­were asso­ciat­ed ­with high­er ­heart ­rates, RER, RPE and plas­ma lac­tate ­response.

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