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CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1999 December;39(4):285-93

 ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Rela­tion­ship ­between ­strength qual­ities and per­for­mance in stand­ing and run-up ver­ti­cal ­jumps

Young W. 1, Wilson G. 2, Byrne C. 1

1 School of ­Human Move­ment and ­Sport Sci­enc­es, Uni­ver­sity of Bal­la­rat, Vic­tor­ia, Aus­tra­lia;
2 The Cen­tre for Exer­cise Sci­ence and ­Sport Man­age­ment South­ern ­Cross Uni­ver­sity, Vic­tor­ia, Aus­tra­lia

Back­ground. The pur­pose of ­this inves­ti­ga­tion was to deter­mine the rela­tion­ships ­between the ­strength qual­ities of the leg exten­sor mus­cu­la­ture and per­for­mance in ver­ti­cal ­jumps (VJ) per­formed ­from a stand­ing posi­tion and a run-up.
Meth­ods. Twen­ty-­nine ­males ­with expe­ri­ence in jump­ing activ­ities ­were test­ed for ver­ti­cal jump­ing capac­ities ­with a stand­ing VJ (dou­ble leg take­off) and run-up ­jumps ­from a 1, 3, 5 and 7 ­stride ­approach (sin­gle leg take­off). The ­speed-­strength and max­i­mum ­strength qual­ities of the leg exten­sors ­were ­assessed by ­tests involv­ing con­cen­tric, ­stretch-short­en­ing ­cycle (SSC) and iso­met­ric mus­cu­lar ­actions. ­Pearson’s cor­re­la­tions and step­wise mul­ti­ple regres­sion was per­formed to ­describe the rela­tion­ships ­with jump­ing per­for­mance.
­Results. The ­speed-­strength ­tests cor­re­lat­ed sig­nif­i­cant­ly ­with ­both ­jump ­types (r=0.55-0.82), but max­i­mum ­strength did not. A ­drop ­jump ­test con­sid­ered to meas­ure reac­tive ­strength cor­re­lat­ed ­more strong­ly ­with the run-up ­jump ­than the stand­ing VJ. The stand­ing VJ was ­best pre­dict­ed by a low ­stretch ­load SSC ­test, where­as the run-up ­jump was ­best pre­dict­ed by a mod­el ­that ­also includ­ing the ­test of reac­tive ­strength.
Con­clu­sion. The ­role of max­i­mum ­strength in jump­ing per­for­mance was not ­clear but ­speed-­strength qual­ities ­were con­sid­ered impor­tant. It was con­clud­ed ­that reac­tive ­strength is rel­a­tive­ly ­more impor­tant for jump­ing ­from a run-up ­than for the stand­ing VJ, and ­this ­should be reflect­ed by appro­pri­ate train­ing meth­ods and ­test pro­to­cols for the assess­ment of ath­letes who ­jump.

language: English


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