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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1999 September;39(3):233-9

Copyright © 2000 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The effect of physical activity and fitness on specific antibody production in college students

Schuler P. B. 1, Lloyd L. K. 2, Leblanc P. A. 3, Clapp T. A. 2, Abadie B. R. 4, Collins R. K. 4

1 Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Health Leisure and Sport, Pensacola University of West Florida; 2 Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Human Performance Studies, Tuscaloosa University of Alabama; 3 Immunology Laboratory, Department of Biological Sciences, Tuscaloosa University of Alabama; 4 Human Performance Laboratory, Department of Physical Education Health Recreation and Sport, Mississippi State University, USA


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Background. The pur­pose of ­this ­study was to deter­mine the ­effect of mod­er­ate phys­i­cal activ­ity/fit­ness on the ­immune ­response to a ­defined anti­gen, in par­tic­u­lar, the hemag­glu­ti­nin-inhi­bi­tion ­response to the H1 (A/Texas/36/91) and H3 (A/Johannesburg/33/94) com­po­nents of the 1995-96 Influenza ­virus vac­cine.
Methods. Sixty-sev­en vol­un­teers 18-30 ­years of age (­mean 21.1+2.3) par­tic­i­pat­ed in the ­study. Physical activ­ity was ­assessed ­using the Stanford 7-Day Recall Questionnaire, phys­i­cal fit­ness (V.O2max) was pre­dict­ed ­based on grad­ed sub­max­i­mal ­cycle ergom­e­try. Participants ­were divid­ed ­into six ­groups (low­er-­active/fit, mod­er­ate ­active/fit, and high­er ­active/fit), ­based on ­their ­scores on the 7-Day Recall Questionnaire or pre­dict­ed V.O2max, respec­tive­ly. Plasma sam­ples ­were col­lect­ed ­prior to, one, two, ­four, and six ­weeks ­post vac­ci­na­tion. A ­total of ­four sep­ar­ate repeat­ed meas­ures ANO­VA ­were uti­lized to eval­u­ate the ­effect of phys­i­cal fit­ness and phys­i­cal activ­ity on the ­immune ­response to the H1 and H3 com­po­nents of the vac­cine.
Results. As expect­ed, for ­both anti­gens, tit­ers sig­nif­i­cant­ly ­increased ­after vac­ci­na­tion, ­with the high­est tit­ers ­found on ­week ­four (H1) and ­week six (H3), respec­tive­ly. However, for ­both anti­gens, ­there was no dif­fer­ence ­between ­groups and no sig­nif­i­cant inter­ac­tion.
Conclusions. The ­results of ­this ­study ­showed no sig­nif­i­cant ­effect of phys­i­cal fit­ness or phys­i­cal activ­ity on the pro­duc­tion of spe­cif­ic anti­body in the ­range of phys­i­cal fit­ness and phys­i­cal activ­ity ­found with­in ­this ­group of col­lege stu­dents.

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