Advanced Search

Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4):344-54

ISSUES AND ARTICLES   MOST READ   eTOC

CURRENT ISSUETHE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology

Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,111

Frequency: Monthly

ISSN 0022-4707

Online ISSN 1827-1928

 

The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4):344-54

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Can emo­tive ­imagery aid in tol­er­ating exer­tion effi­ciently?

Coote D., Tenenbaum G.

Depart­ment of Psy­chology, Uni­ver­sity of ­Southern Queens­land, Too­woomba Queens­land, Aus­tralia

Back­ground. The ­study exam­ined the ­role of relax­ia­tion and aggres­sive ­types of ­imagery and the ­effect of ­goal orien­ta­tions, ­self effi­cacy, ­self con­trol, and deter­mi­na­tion on exer­tion tol­er­ance.
­Methods. Experi­mental ­design: the par­tic­i­pants under­went an exer­tive ­task in ­which ­they ­were ­required to ­squeeze a dyna­mom­eter, at 50% of ­their max­imal ­hand-­grip ­capacity, for as ­long as ­they ­could. Per­ceived exer­tion was meas­ured ­every 15 ­sec ­during the ­task. The ­time ­that ­elapsed ­between ­rating exer­tion as “­strong”, and drop­ping the ­handbar ­under 10% of the des­ig­nated 50% cri­terion, was con­sid­ered as the “­zone of exer­tion tol­er­ance”. Par­tic­i­pants: ­forty-­eight ­female uni­ver­sity stu­dents ­were ran­domly ­assigned ­into 3 ­groups. Inter­ven­tions: two ­imagery tech­niques, one ­under ­relaxing and one ­under aggres­sive con­di­tions ­were ­taught and ­then ­applied. In the con­trol con­di­tion, dis­cus­sions ­were con­ducted. Meas­ures: ­traits ­such as ­goal orien­ta­tion (­task and ego), phys­ical ­self-effi­cacy and ­self-con­trol ­were meas­ured ­prior to per­forming the ­task, ­while ­rate of per­ceived exer­tion ­task-spe­cific deter­mi­na­tion (i.e., ­task-­related con­fi­dence, com­mit­ment, exer­tion tol­er­ance, and ­effort invest­ment) ­were meas­ured ­before, ­during and ­after the ­task.
­Results. The ­results ­showed an ­average of 31% and 28% ­increase in exer­tion tol­er­ance in par­tic­i­pants who ­used aggres­sive and relax­a­tion ­imagery tech­niques respec­tively, com­pared to 4% reduc­tion in the con­trols. RM ­ANOVA indi­cated ­equality ­between the two ­imagery ­groups but ­both ­were sig­nif­i­cantly dif­ferent ­from the con­trol ­group. Phys­ical ­self-effi­cacy, ­self-con­trol, and ­task-spe­cific deter­mi­na­tion ­were ­found non­sig­nif­i­cant, but ­their impor­tant ­roles in ­coping ­with aver­sive ­stimuli are high­lighted. It was evi­dent ­that the “­coping” mech­a­nism ­rather ­than the “dis­trac­tion” mech­a­nism ­accounted for the ­larger sus­tain in the “­zone of exer­tion tol­er­ance”.
Con­clu­sions. ­Imagery can be ­used effi­ciently in exer­tion tol­er­ance but ­more ­studies are ­needed on ath­letes.

language: English


FULL TEXT  REPRINTS

top of page