Home > Journals > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness > Past Issues > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4) > The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4):298-304

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

THE JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE AND PHYSICAL FITNESS

A Journal on Applied Physiology, Biomechanics, Preventive Medicine,
Sports Medicine and Traumatology, Sports Psychology


Indexed/Abstracted in: Chemical Abstracts, CINAHL, Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index Expanded (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,215


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  


The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 December;38(4):298-304

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Effect of summer intermission on skeletal muscle of adolescent soccer players

Amigò N. 2, Cadefau J. A. 1, Ferrer I. 3, Tarrados N. 4, Cussò R. 1

1 Unitat de Bioquímica, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain; 2 Servei de Medicina Deportiva del RCD Espanyol, Barcelona, Spain; 3 Servei d’Anatomia Patológica, Hospital Princeps d’Espanya, Hospitalet; 4 Servei de Medicina Deportiva Municipal d’Avilés, Austuries


PDF  


Background. To ­study the ­effect of ­some ­weeks of ­rest on ­three ­groups of ado­les­cent soc­cer ­players, who had under­gone system­at­ic train­ing for ­eleven ­months.
Methods. Experimental ­design: Ret­ro­spec­tive and com­par­a­tive inves­ti­ga­tion; dura­tion 4-8 ­weeks. Setting: young ama­teur ­players ­from a Spanish foot­ball ­club ­were exam­ined at the begin­ning and at the end of the sum­mer ­rest peri­od. Participants: 37 ­young soc­cer ­players ­aged 14, 15 and 16 ­years old. They ­were mem­bers of ­three foot­ball ­teams. Interventions: during the ­rest peri­od ­they ­were ­free ­from any train­ing pro­gram. Measures: biopsies of M. vas­tus lat­er­al­is ­were tak­en imme­di­ate­ly ­after train­ing and ­after the sum­mer hol­i­days. The ­type, per­cent­age and diam­e­ter of the ­fibers, as ­well as the ­enzymes of gly­co­gen metab­olism (gly­co­gen syn­thase and gly­co­gen phos­phor­y­lase), gly­col­y­sis (phos­pho­fructok­i­nase and lac­tate dehy­drog­e­nase), oxi­da­tive metab­olism (suc­ci­nate dehy­drog­e­nase and cit­rate syn­thase) and crea­tine ­kinase and trans­am­i­nase (aspar­tate and ala­nine ami­no­trans­fe­rase) ­were stud­ied.
Results. Detraining had an adap­ta­tion ­effect, decreas­ing the ­cross-sec­tion­al ­area of ­type I and ­type II ­fibers, and decreas­ing the activ­ities of crea­tine ­kinase, cit­rate syn­thase, phos­pho­fruc­tok­i­nase, lac­tate dehy­drog­e­nase and aspar­tate ami­no­trans­fe­rase.
Conclusions. The ­results can ­help train­ers to ­plan the ­length of the ­rest peri­od ­between train­ing.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail