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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 September;38(3):215-20

Copyright © 1999 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Lactate production in response to maximal and submaximal StairMaster PT4000 and treadmill exercise

Schuler P. B. 1, Martino M. 2, Abadie B. R. 3, Stout T. W. 3, Conn P. T. 3, Wang M. Q. 4

1 Department of Health Leisure and Sport, The University of West Florida, Pensacola, USA; 2 Human Performance Laboratory, University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, USA; 3 Human Performance Laboratory, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, USA; 4 Health Studies, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, USA


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Back­ground. The pur­pose of ­this ­study was to ­measure the ­amount of lac­tate pro­duced, as an indi­ca­tion of ­fatigue, in ­response to max­imal and submax­imal stair­stepper (SM) and tread­mill (TM) exer­cise.
­Methods. ­Thirty vol­un­teers (15 ­males, ­mean age 23 yrs; 15 ­females, ­mean age 22 yrs) com­pleted max­imal and submax­imal SM and TM pro­to­cols on ­four sep­arate ­visits to the labor­a­tory to deter­mine max­imal ­oxygen con­sump­tion (V.O2max), and ­blood lac­tate con­cen­tra­tions. Max­imal TM ­testing con­sisted of the ­Bruce pro­tocol, ­while the max­imal SM pro­tocol ­involved pro­gressing in incre­ments of 2 ­levels ­every 2 min­utes. ­Eight min­utes of sub­max­imal TM and SM exer­cise was per­formed at an inten­sity of 65% of V.O2max, as meas­ured ­during max­imal TM and SM ­testing. ­Fifty micro­li­ters of ­blood was col­lected via fin­ger­prick of the ­index ­finger ­prior to, and imme­di­ately ­post max­imal and submax­imal TM and SM exer­cise, and ­during min­utes 3, 5, and 7 of ­active ­recovery. Red ­blood ­cells ­were ­lysed and ana­lyzed imme­di­ately ­using the YSI #1500 ­Sport lac­tate ana­lyzer.
­Results. TM-VO2max, was sig­nif­i­cantly ­higher for ­both, ­males and ­females, com­pared to SM-V.O2max. ­Repeated meas­ured anal­yses of var­i­ance ­revealed sig­nif­i­cantly ­higher ­blood lac­tate ­levels ­during the ­same rel­a­tive submax­imal work­loads for SM com­pared to TM exer­cise.
Con­clu­sions. ­These find­ings sug­gest ­that an ­increased lac­tate pro­duc­tion ­during submax­imal SM exer­cise may ­result in ­early ­fatigue and, ­thereby, ­limit max­imal per­for­mance on the SM.

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