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The Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness 1998 March;38(1):39-46

Copyright © 1998 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Blood lactate concentrations during exercise: effect of sampling site and exercise mode

Dassonville J. 1, Beillot J. 1, Lessard Y. 2, Jan J. 1, André A. M. 1, Le Pourcelet C. 1, Rochcongar P. 1, Carré F. 1

1 Unité de Biologie et de Médecine du Sport, Pr Le Bars, Hôpital Pontchaillou, Rennes, France; 2 Laboratoire des Explorations Fonctionnelles


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Background. The pur­pose of the ­study was to com­pare ­blood lac­tate con­cen­tra­tions deter­mined in ­blood sam­pled ­from ­three ­sites (fin­ger cap­il­lary, ear-­lobe cap­il­lary, and fore­arm ­vein) dur­ing exer­cise on ­three dif­fer­ent ergom­e­ters (a ­cycle ergom­e­ter, a tread­mill and an arm-­crank ergom­e­ter).
Methods. A ­total of 312 ­well-­trained sub­iects per­formed ­either a six-min­ute ­steady-­state exer­cise (n=219) or an incre­men­tal exer­cise ­test ­until exhaus­tion (n=93). Blood was sam­pled ­from two ­sites ­after ­each exer­cise ­test and at the end of ­each ­stage of the incre­men­tal pro­to­col, 852 ­pairs of ­blood sam­ples ­were ana­lysed.
Results. Results ­showed ­that, ­when exer­cise was per­formed on a ­cycle ergom­e­ter or a tread­mill, no sig­nif­i­cant dif­fer­enc­es ­between ­venous and ear cap­il­lary sam­ples ­were ­observed where­as fin­ger cap­il­lary val­ues ­were high­er. On an arm-­crank ergom­e­ter, ­venous and fin­ger cap­il­lary lac­tate con­cen­tra­tions ­were usu­al­ly high­er ­than ear cap­il­lary val­ues ­with ­some dis­crep­an­cies depend­ing on the ­times of sam­pling.
Conclusions. We con­clude ­that lac­tate val­ues may dif­fer depend­ing on the sam­pling ­site and the ­type of exer­cise ­mode. An ear cap­il­lary sample may be pre­ferred ­because it is ­less affect­ed by lac­tate ­release in the ­arms and easi­er to ­obtain.

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