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Panminerva Medica 2000 September;42(3):193-5

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

The use of intravenous immunoglobulin in sine causa or alloimmune recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA)

Patriarca A., Piccioni V., Gigante V., Benedetto C.

From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chair C University of Turin, Italy


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Background. Recurrent spon­ta­neous abor­tion (RSA) has an inci­dence of 0.5%-1%. It is th­ought ­that ­immune reac­tion dis­or­ders in the ­mother may ­evolve in unex­plained RSA, ­which has a ­higher inci­dence in ­women ­over 40 ­years old.
Methods. Twenty-­three ­patients ­with recur­rent spon­ta­neous abor­tion of ­unknown ­origin and two auto­im­mune ­cases ­were ­treated ­with intra­ve­nous spe­cific immu­no­glob­u­lins at the 5th-6th ­week of preg­nancy and fif­teen ­days ­later.
Results. After treat­ment, nine­teen ­patients ­brought ­their preg­nancy to ­term, ­five ­aborted, one is preg­nant at ­present.
Conclusions. The use of immu­no­glob­u­lins ­seems to be effi­ca­cious in recur­rent spon­ta­neous abor­tion of ­unknown ­origin. Our ­results sup­port the ­theory ­that ­this treat­ment is ­able to pas­sively ­transfer the ­sparking off ­factor ­that ­allows the preg­nancy to ­evolve.

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