Advanced Search

Home > Journals > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging > Archive > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2013 March;57(1) > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2013 March;57(1):66-78

CURRENT ISSUE   ARCHIVE   EPUB AHEAD OF PRINT   MOST READ   eTOC


THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2013 March;57(1):66-78

MIBG IN NEUROBLASTOMA 

    REVIEWS

Optimization of molecular radiotherapy with [131I]-meta Iodobenzylguanidine for high-risk neuroblastoma

Gaze M. N. 1, Gains J. E. 1, Walker C. 1, Bomanji J. B. 2

1 Department of Oncology, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK;
2 Department of Nuclear Medicine, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK

Molecular radiotherapy with [131I]-meta Iodobenzylguanidine ([131I]-mIBG) for neuroblastoma has been in clinical use for nearly 30 years. In this time, its role has changed from being an exclusively palliative treatment to one where the intent of treatment is often curative. To achieve this, the treatment has been brought forward from the relapse setting, to the beginning as induction therapy, as a possibility for salvage of those with chemo-refractory disease or as part of consolidation schedules. With the routine use of hemopoietic support, higher than previously standard administered activities are now commonly used. Other attempts to improve outcomes include the concomitant use of chemotherapy and radiation sensitisers and novel formulations such as no-carrier added [131I]-mIBG. Unfortunately, none of these strategies has been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial, so whether the theoretical benefits of these innovative approaches are seen clinically remains a matter of conjecture. Despite the prevalent belief in using higher administered activities, dosimetry has been under-used, hampering the ability to detect the benefit of this strategy. To properly evaluate concepts aiming at the optimisation of molecular radiotherapy with [131I]-mIBG for high-risk neuroblastoma, careful dosimetry in well-designed randomized clinical trials is essential. Only in this way will it be possible for [131I]-mIBG to be used to its best advantage in the complex multimodality treatment schedules required for high-risk neuroblastoma.

language: English


FULL TEXT  REPRINTS

top of page