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CURRENT ISSUETHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
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REVIEWS  SPECIAL ISSUE ON PET/CT AND RADIOTHERAPY


The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular imaging 2010 October;54(5):455-75

language: English

PET/CT for radiotherapy: image acquisition and data processing

Bettinardi V. 1,2, Picchio M. 1,2, Di Muzio N. 3, Gianolli L. 1, Messa C. 2,4,5,6, Gilardi M. C. 1,2,4

1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy;
2 Institute for Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, National Research Council, Milan, Italy;
3 Department of Radiotherapy, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy;
4 Center for Molecular Bioimaging, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milan, Italy;
5 Department of Nuclear Medicine, San Gerardo Hospital, Monza, Italy;
6 L.A.T.O, HSR-Giglio, Cefalù, Palermo, Italy


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This paper focuses on acquisition and processing methods in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for radiotherapy (RT) applications. The recent technological evolutions of PET/CT systems are described. Particular emphasis is dedicated to the tools needed for the patient positioning and immobilization, to be used in PET/CT studies as well as during RT treatment sessions. The effect of organ and lesion motion due to patient’s respiration on PET/CT imaging is discussed. Breathing protocols proposed to minimize PET/CT spatial mismatches in relation to respiratory movements are illustrated. The respiratory gated (RG) 4D-PET/CT techniques, developed to measure and compensate for organ and lesion motion, are then introduced. Finally a description is provided of different acquisition and data processing techniques, implemented with the aim at improving: i) image quality and quantitative accuracy of PET images, and ii) target volume definition and treatment planning in RT, by using specific and personalised motion information.

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