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CURRENT ISSUETHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular imaging 2009 December;53(6):618-30

MOLECULAR IMAGING BEYOND NUCLEAR MEDICINE 

 REVIEWS

Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the study of human brain cancer

Martínez-Bisbal M. C. 1,2, Celda B. 1,2

1 Networking Research Center on Bioengineering Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN), Valencia, Spain;
2 Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Valencia, Burjasot, Valencia, Spain

Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is a non-invasive imaging technique that provides metabolic information on brain tumor. This biochemical information can be processed and presented as density maps of several metabolites, among them N-acetylaspartate (marker of neuronal viability), choline (marker of membrane turnover), creatine (related to the energy state of the cells), myo-Inositol (exclusively found in astrocytes), lipids and lactate (observed in necrosis and other pathological processes) which mean relevant information in the context of brain tumors. Thus, this technique is a multiparametrical molecular imaging method that can complete the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study enabling the detection of biochemical patterns of different features and aspects of brain tumors. In this article, the role of MRSI as a molecular imaging technique to provide biochemical information on human brain tumors is reviewed. The most frequent questions and situations in the study of human brain tumors in clinical settings will be considered, as well as the distinction of neoplastic lesions from non neoplastic, the tumor type identification, the study of heterogeneity and infiltration of normal appearing white matter and the therapy following with detection of side effects. The great amount of data in MRSI acquisition compared to the single voxel techniques requires the use of automated methods of quantification, but the possibility to obtain self-reference in the non-affected areas allows different strategies for data handling and interpretation, as presented in the literature. The combination of MRSI with other physiological MRI techniques and positron emission tomography is also included in this review.

language: English


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