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CURRENT ISSUETHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 1,724

Frequency: Quarterly

ISSN 1824-4785

Online ISSN 1827-1936

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2009 April;53(2):193-200

PET-CT FOR TAILORING THERAPY OF SOLID TUMORS 

Assessing tumor hypoxia by positron emission tomography with Cu-ATSM

Holland J. P. 1, Lewis J. S. 1,2, Dehdashti F. 3

1 Radiochemistry Service, Department of Radiology Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA
2 Sloan-Kettering Institute, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA
3 Division of Nuclear Medicine Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology Washington University School of MedicineSt. Louis, Missouri, MO, USA

For the last several decades, hypoxia has been recognized to be one of the key factors in tumor aggression and an important impediment to local and distant control of malignant tumors. In addition, hypoxia is a major cause of failure of both radiation therapy and chemotherapy. It has been shown that hypoxia is an independent negative prognostic factor for patient outcome in various solid tumors. Clinical studies using polarographic oxygen electrodes, as a tool for measuring hypoxia, were the first to demonstrate the presence of hypoxia in human tumors and its association with poor prognosis. However, this method is invasive and has technical limitations that prevent its routine clinical use. Over the years, imaging as a noninvasive method has attracted a lot of attention and several radiotracers have been developed for noninvasive evaluation of hypoxia. One of the most promising radiotracers is the copper(II) complex of diacetyl-2,3-bis(N4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazonato) ligand (Cu-ATSM) for imaging with positron emission tomography. In this review, the preclinical evaluation of Cu-ATSM as well as its clinical value in several solid tumors will be discussed.

language: English


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