Home > Journals > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging > Past Issues > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2006 September;50(3) > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2006 September;50(3):217-25

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,481


eTOC

 

ORIGINAL ARTICLES  INFLAMMATION AND INFECTION PART 2FREEfree


The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2006 September;50(3):217-25

Copyright © 2006 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

New radiopharmaceuticals for imaging rheumatoid arthritis

Chianelli M. 1, 2, D’Alessandria C. 1, Conti F. 3, Priori R. 3, Valesini G. 3, Annovazzi A. 2, 4, Signore A. 2, 4

1 Department of Nuclear Medicine Regina Apostolorum Hospital, Albano, Rome, Italy 2 Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands 3 Rheumatology Unit, Department of Medical Therapy La Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy 4 Department of Nuclear Medicine, 2nd Faculty of Medicine La Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy


FULL TEXT  


Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an incapacitating chronic inflammatory disease of the joints that, because of frequent relapses, requires life-long treatment. In patients affected with RA an important treatment objective is to achieve specific immune suppression in order to extinguish the immune process and arrest the disease, thus preventing or delaying complications and avoiding disease recurrence. The side effects of anti-inflammatory drugs given to improve the quality of life of these patients can be reduced with the use of specific immune therapies that block, as selectively as possible, the pathologic mechanism responsible for the disease. New therapeutic options for specific, targeted therapies for treating RA are being developed, and trials to assess the efficacy and safety of these approaches are underway. However, these therapies rely primarily on clinical assessment to evaluate treatment efficacy. It would be useful, therefore, to have an objective and reliable method that directly highlights the immune processes underlying the disease. Currently available radiopharmaceuticals for imaging RA, with a special emphasis on recently developed agents and their use in therapy decision-making and follow-up are the focus of this article.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail