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CURRENT ISSUETHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,413

Frequency: Quarterly

ISSN 1824-4785

Online ISSN 1827-1936

 

The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2005 December;49(4):339-48

CELL LABELING 

    REVIEWS

In vivo tracking for cell therapies

Thompson M. 1, Wall D. M. 2, Hicks R. J. 1,3, Prince H. M. 2,3

1 Department of Diagnostic Imaging Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia
2 Centre for Blood Cell Therapies Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia
3 University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia

The success of a particular cellular therapy regime requires the therapeutic agent to migrate expeditiously to the intended target in sufficient numbers and to provoke a desirable response. There are many variables associated with the production, administration and host that need to be investigated to maximize the resulting therapeutic benefit. The large number of factors which may contribute to, or detract from, treatment efficacy can make therapy optimization an arduous procedure. Direct visualization of in vivo migration patterns using nuclear medicine techniques greatly assists the appraisal of the multitude of variables. Conventional radionuclide cell labeling is a proven, simple and sensitive technique which can provide whole body biodistribution information. Labeling with a PET isotope offers greater sensitivity, much improved 3-dimensional resolution and quantification. In general, current efforts are increasingly concentrating on this technology. Imaging studies can supply definitive evidence of successful targeting and allow quantification of the degree of migration to a particular site. Incorporating tracking studies into clinical trials of cell-based therapy at the earliest stage can provide proof of mechanism of the therapy and permit evaluation of the many contributory variables, even on a patient-by-patient basis.

language: English


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