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THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
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The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2004 June;48(2):164-73

Copyright © 2009 EDIZIONI MINERVA MEDICA

language: English

Position of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnostic work-up of neuroendocrine tumors

Demir H. 1, Berk F. 1, Raderer M. 2, Plowman P. N. 3, Lassen U. 4, Daugaard G. 4, Clausen M. 5, Bohuslavizki K. H. 5, Peters M. 6, Harmer C. 7, Malamitsi J. 8, Aktolun C. 1

1 Department of Nuclear Medicine Kocaeli University School of Medicine, Kocaeli, Turkey 2 Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine,University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria 3 Department of Oncology, St. Barthelomews Hospital London, UK 4 Department of Oncology, The Finsen Centre Copenhagen University Hospital, Copehagen, Denmark 5 Department of Nuclear Medicine University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany 6 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Addenbrookes Hospital Cambridge University, Cambridge, UK 7 Department of Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, UK 8 Department of Nuclear Medicine University of Athens, Athens, Greece


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Cancer of ­unknown ori­gin (CUO) is ­defined by the ­absence of any pri­mary ­tumour in biop­sy-proved met­a­stat­ic can­cer. CUO ­accounts for a 5-10% of all malig­nan­cies. These ­tumors ­have a spe­cif­ic biol­o­gy ­with clin­i­cal char­ac­ter­is­tics of rap­id pro­gres­sion and atyp­i­cal metas­ta­ses. Diagnostic eval­u­a­tion is direct­ed at the iden­tifi­ca­tion of treat­able sub­set. Accurate diag­nos­tic work­up is cru­cial ­because ­both prog­no­sis and sur­vi­val ­rates ­depend main­ly on detec­tion of the pri­mary ­tumor ­site. Although ­these ­patients under­go exten­sive imag­ing pro­ce­dures, nucle­ar med­i­cine tech­niques are ­under-uti­lized ­despite ­their abil­ity of pro­vid­ing molec­u­lar infor­ma­tion. Positron emis­sion tomog­ra­phy has an emerg­ing ­role in ­this clin­i­cal chal­lenge ­along ­with oth­er nucle­ar med­i­cine meth­ods includ­ing, ­bone ­scan, thy­roid scin­tig­ra­phy.

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