Home > Journals > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging > Past Issues > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2004 June;48(2) > The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2004 June;48(2):96-108

CURRENT ISSUE
 

ARTICLE TOOLS

Reprints

THE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
Impact Factor 2,413


eTOC

 

  NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND ONCOLOGY


The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging 2004 June;48(2):96-108

language: English

Position of positron emission tomography and other imaging diagnostic modalities in esophageal cancer

Flamen P. 1, Lerut T. 2, Haustermans K. 3, Van Cutsem E. 4, Mortelmans L. 1

1 Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Leuven Leuven, Belgium
2 Department of Thoracic Surgery University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
3 Department of Radiotherapy University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
4 Department of Internal Medicine/Digestive Oncology University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium


FULL TEXT  


Positron emission tomography (PET) using the positron emitting glucose analogue 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) has emerged as a useful metabolism-based wholebody imaging tool for gastro-esophageal cancer diagnosis and follow up. Most large cancer centers worldwide are now equipped for PET (or even PET-CT). Therefore, there is a growing need for a clear definition of the relative position of PET within the currenly available diagnostic modalities. Significant scientific data indicate that FDG-PET adds clinically useful information to the information obtained by standard means (mainly CT and endoscopic ultrasound) throughout the different phases of clinical patient management: 1) at initial diagnosis: PET detects more frequently distant lymph node involvement and organ metastases compared to conventional diagnostics, allowing a more accurate selection of the most appropriate treatment; 2) during chemotherapy: semi-quantitative FDG-PET allows early identification of non-responding patients. Indeed, the metabolic response as measured by serial FDG-PET can be used to predict the clinical and histopathological response. Moreover, the PET-response seems to be related to overall and disease free survival; 3) after a treatment: FDG-PET allows accurate assessment of the residual tumor load; 4) in the follow up: FDG-PET allows accurate detection and restaging of recurrent disease.

top of page

Publication History

Cite this article as

Corresponding author e-mail