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CURRENT ISSUETHE QUARTERLY JOURNAL OF NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING

A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging


A Journal on Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Affiliated to the Society of Radiopharmaceutical Sciences and to the International Research Group of Immunoscintigraphy
Indexed/Abstracted in: Current Contents/Clinical Medicine, EMBASE, PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Citation Index (SciSearch), Scopus
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The Quarterly Journal of Nuclear Medicine 2003 December;47(4):238-45

USE OF RADIOLABELLED PEPTIDES FOR SCINTIGRAPHY IN NON-ONCOLOGIC DISEASES 

99mTc-Antimicrobial peptides: promising candidates for infection imaging

Lupetti A. 1,2, Pauwels E. K. J. 3, Nibbering P. H. 1, Welling M. M. 3

1 Department of Infectious Diseases Leiden University Medical Center (­LUMC) Leiden, The Netherlands
2 Department of Experimental Pathology Medical Biotechnologies, Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
3 Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, ­LUMC The Netherlands

This ­review ­presents the ­state of the art of imag­ing of bac­te­ri­al and fun­gal infec­tions in labor­a­to­ry ani­mals ­using anti­mi­cro­bi­al pep­tides ­labelled ­with tech­ne­tium-99m (99mTc). The mechan­is­tic ­basis of ­this ­approach is ­that ­these pep­tides accu­mu­late at ­sites of infec­tion, but not in ster­ile inflam­ma­to­ry ­lesions, ­because of ­their pref­e­ren­tial bind­ing to bac­te­ria and fun­gi ­over mam­mal­ian ­cells. For prac­ti­cal rea­sons, ­such as pro­duc­tion of ­large ­amounts of pep­tides ­under ­good labor­a­to­ry prac­tice con­di­tions and favour­able phar­ma­cok­i­net­ics, syn­thet­ic pep­tides rep­re­sent­ing ­such bind­ing ­domains of nat­u­ral anti­mi­cro­bi­al pep­tides are pre­ferred. On the ­basis of ­their pref­e­ren­tial in ­vitro and in ­vivo bind­ing to micro­or­gan­isms ­over ­human ­cells, ­fast and ­easy pen­e­tra­tion ­into the tar­get ­area, and rap­id clear­ance ­from the cir­cu­la­tion via the uri­nary ­tract, var­i­ous 99mTc-anti­mi­cro­bi­al pep­tides ­were iden­ti­fied. Next, it was deter­mined wheth­er ­these radio­phar­ma­ceu­ti­cals dis­tin­guish infec­tious ­foci ­from ­sites of ster­ile inflam­ma­tion. Further experi­ments ­with 99mTc-ubi­qui­ci­din-­derived pep­tides in infect­ed labor­a­to­ry ani­mals ­have ­revealed ­that the radio­ac­tiv­ity at the infec­tious ­site cor­re­lat­ed ­well ­with the num­ber of ­viable bac­te­ria ­present, indi­cat­ing ­that ­these 99mTc-­labelled pep­tides may ­enable the mon­i­tor­ing of the effi­ca­cy of anti­mi­cro­bi­al ther­a­py. Together, 99mTc-­labelled syn­thet­ic pep­tides ­derived ­from ­human ubi­qui­ci­din are prom­is­ing can­di­dates for imag­ing of bac­te­ri­al and fun­gal infec­tions in nucle­ar med­i­cine.

language: English


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